Meet The Pie Lady

In late 2015, Cindy Bailey became an empty nester. Her daughter was a student at Virginia Tech, and her son would soon be leaving for West Virginia. As the reality of these changes began to set in, Cindy looked around her family’s home and thought it might be time to make a few changes of her own.

“I was a stay-at-home mom and worked part-time across the street at Ikenberry Autumn Adventure. My friend, who works at Ikenberry, told me that The Pie Lady was selling her business. She encouraged me to buy it,” Cindy recalls.

Cindy and her husband met with the original owner of The Pie Lady, Lisa. They decided that a business out of their home was ideal and convenient. In the fall of 2015, they began transforming their family room, initially a garage with a beautiful fireplace, into The Pie Lady kitchen. Perhaps it is the lingering family atmosphere, or the fact that Cindy and her husband live in the house adjacent to the kitchen, but it is reminiscent of a simpler time when families gathered around stovetops to share recipes and secrets. The large, open space is welcoming from the moment you walk through the door.

Although Cindy enjoys the cooking aspect of The Pie Lady, her passion is in the marketing of the product. Selling the pies gives her an opportunity to connect with her customers. As Cindy explains, people don’t feel guilty about spending money on food. Not only is it something they will use and enjoy, it often encourages their family to gather around a table together—free from the distractions of daily life.

Of course, The Pie Lady’s pies are different than the ones you will find boxed up in the freezer section of your grocery store. While they are convenient to prepare, they are also homemade. Cindy’s friend, Debbie, is her kitchen manager. Together, they work hard to produce quality products made from scratch.

“They are not the American Chicken Pot Pie,” Cindy explains. “They are a meat pie, like the French variety. It is more meat-based than gravy-based. The chicken is shredded. It is kind of like a quiche.”

There are nine varieties of dinner pies including Just Chicken, Buffalo Chicken, Chicken Fajita, Chicken and Vegetables, and Chicken Cordon Bleu. Customers can also purchase a Chocolate Pecan dessert pie.

You can find Cindy at events throughout the area, and her pies may soon be in some of your favorite local stores.

“Ikenberry’s wants to carry them, and so does Heritage Family Market. We have locations in Lexington and Radford that want to carry them too. We just have to be able to keep up with the supply,” she says.

That said, they are open to wholesale and fundraising opportunities. If you are interested in purchasing a pie for your family, or simply want to learn more about The Pie Lady, check out their Facebook page: www.facebook.com/thepieladychickenpies.

 

 

Fearless Release Party

We are excited to sponsor the official release party for Fearless–A Woman’s Guide to Self Protection by Logan Doughty at Parkway Brewing Company on Sunday, Marcy 26!

The event will begin at 4 pm, and will feature the author Logan Doughty, also owner and instructor at Personal Self Protection LLC.
Guests can use this opportunity to participate in a question and answer session on Personal Self Protection, promotions throughout the evening, raffle drawings, and more!

Those who purchase Fearless will receive their own SABRE pepper spray, and can have the book signed while they are there. Foster Burton, lead singer of Mad Iguanas, and Teresa Berry, of SARA Roanoke, will also be in attendance.

There is no cover charge for this event. RSVP on Facebook, and let us know you are coming!

 

 

Opera Roanoke Makes Case for the Arts

In a time when the NEA (National Endowment of the Arts) might face elimination due to proposed budget cuts, Opera Roanoke is pushing for more arts & culture in the region.
The 41-year-old non-profit organization announced the appointment of Nancy Harder as the Director of Outreach and Associate Conductor.
“I am thrilled to join Opera Roanoke in a leadership role after my involvement as a pianist and vocal coach,” says Ms. Harder. “Opera Roanoke is an innovative, exciting opera company with a national reputation that is an integral part of the arts & culture scene in Roanoke and the New River Valley. I look forward to playing a significant role in its future.”
Opera Roanoke was recently named as one of only a handful of recipients of OPERA America’s highly competitive Building Opera Audiences grant.
“The most recent grant awardees demonstrate the many ways companies are developing innovative strategies to not only attract audiences, but to increase the civic impact of new works — by engaging generative artists with local communities, developing partnerships with organizations outside the arts, and facilitating dialogue to connect storytelling with contemporary issues”, said Marc Scorca, OPERA America President/CEO.
Following the OPERA America announcement, Opera Roanoke was awarded a $50,000 challenge grant from the Ceres Foundation. The grant must be matched by new contributions before June 30. The grant will assist Opera Roanoke in leveraging funds towards its productions, programs and youth music education opportunities in our region.
As a way to connect with new audiences, Opera Roanoke will be holding its first “Opera Tap Takeover” at Soaring Ridge Brewery on April 19 at 6pm. The fundraising event includes great southern food, live music and craft beer.
And on April 28 & 30, Opera Roanoke will present Carlisle Floyd’s American opera Susannah at the Jefferson Center under the baton of Metropolitan Opera conductor, Steven White. Artistic Director Scott Williamson will direct the company premiere of Floyd’s award-winning “folk” opera, set in the Appalachian mountains, which will feature the mainstage debut of Met Opera soprano, Danielle Talamantes.
“We couldn’t be more excited and grateful for all of the great things happening right now,” said Williamson. “The recognition and support from OPERA America, one of the leading arts organizations in the country, and the matching grant from one of our most generous foundations just heightens the anticipation of our premiere production of Floyd’s Susannah. We hope our community here will not only share the excitement of our good news, but will join us for this moving and lyrical drama, full of music which sounds like it came from our beloved Blue Ridge Mountains.”

For more information on Opera Roanoke, and how you can help give back to keep the arts alive in our region visit www.operaroanoke.org.

Women and Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease has a striking impact on the lives of individuals, but it can be especially strong for women–whether they are living with the disease or they are caregivers, relatives, friends, or loved ones of those directly affected.

So, why do we feel that women are impacted more significantly than their male counterparts? The answer is that we do not completely understand the why but we do know that Alzheimer’s dementia disproportionately affects women in a variety of ways. According to Alzheimer’s Association research, women are 2.5 times more likely to provide 24-hour care for an affected relative than males. Many of them have been forced to quit work or reduce their work schedules to do so. This can have a long-term effect on them financially, emotionally, and physically.

In addition, women make up nearly two-thirds of the more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s today.  The Alzheimer’s Association states in their 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures, that an estimated 3.3 million women aged 65 and older in the United States have this disease.

Researchers are passionately working to determine if or why women develop the disease at a higher rate than men. Even though women live longer than men and age is a significant risk factor, researchers suggest that longevity alone may not account for the unequal disease burden that women face. Studies have revealed that there may be distinct biological and genetic factors shaping how the disease develops and progresses in women.

The Alzheimer’s Association concludes that more research is needed to understand the different roles that genetics, hormones and lifestyle factors play in Alzheimer’s in men and women. Several factors now in the spotlight that are potentially modifiable are years of education, occupation, exercise, diet, stress, anxiety and sleep. A better understanding of these differences will be extremely important as we move forward with more effective strategies for treating, preventing, and diagnosing Alzheimer’s.

With all the unknowns, we can say that Alzheimer’s disease remains one of the most critical public health issues in America. The Alzheimer’s Association is the leader in advocating for public policy issues and critical research funding. Call 1.800.272.3900 or www.alz.org to see how you can join the fight.

Resources:
Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures reports and excerpts from “Sex biology contributions to vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease”: A think tank convened by the Women’s Alzheimer’s Research Initiative.  The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Submitted by Annette Clark, MsG, Alzheimer’s Association, Family Services Director

 

Spring Happenings!

As the weather gets warmer, your schedule should begin to look a little brighter. With fun events happening locally throughout March, there will be something for the whole family. Check out our favorites below:

McDonald’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Shamrock Festival
Don’t miss the annual St. Patrick’s Day celebration on Saturday, March 11, beginning at 11 am in Downtown Roanoke. This is a great event for families with two free McDonald’s Kid’s Zone locations available from 12 to 5pm. Children can enjoy games, inflatables, face painting, and more in front of the Taubman Museum of Art on Salem Avenue and in Market Square. Corned Beef & Co. will host a Celtic Celebration from 10 am to 5 pm, and Martin’s St. Pats Block Party will open at 11 am. Visit www.downtownroanoke.org for more information.

American Impressionism in the Garden at the Taubman Museum of Art
The American Impressionism in the Garden exhibit at the Taubman Museum of Art includes several new loans from major institutions across the United States. During the late 19th century, many American Impressionist artists studied alongside their French counterparts in Paris and Giverny to capture light’s fleeting effects by painting en plein air, or outside. They distinguished themselves by depicting uniquely American subjects—notably, the garden. This exhibition explores that era, breathing in the fresh aroma of a world in bloom. It will be on view until May 14. Go to www.taubmanmuseum.org for information.

Just Stevii Presents: Experience!
A free event to encourage women to empower themselves and reach their full potential is a great way to celebrate Women’s History Month. That’s why we are so excited that Just Stevii Presents: Experience! will take place at the Kirk Family YMCA on Friday, March 17 from 5 to 9 pm. Roanoke is one of four stops on Stevii Aisha Mills’ cross-country tour. Stevii is a motivational speaker with a goal to help women who are dedicated to pushing past their past to loudly (and proudly!) declare, “I love my life!” Her event will feature several fantastic vendors, including The Purposeful Speaker and Total Life Changes. Visit www.stevii.com/experience to learn more.

 

Women’s March on Roanoke

It began last year at a Christmas party. Djuna Osborne approached her friend, Leslie Cramer, disheartened by the post-election climate.
“In general, there was so much negativity, hate, and discrimination. Everything you heard felt like you had to fact check it on every side. It felt very wrong in terms of the core of American values,” recalls Leslie.
At this point, Djuna had the paperwork to begin planning the Women’s March on Roanoke. She was ready to do it by herself, expecting around 50 people to attend. Leslie offered to help, and the idea quickly gained traction on social media. On January 21, over 3000 people participated in the Women’s March on Roanoke. Around the nation, millions of women and men turned out for sister marches. Now, two months later, it is important to keep that momentum alive. Together, with a group of volunteers, Leslie and Djuna are doing just that on a local level.
With an election coming up in November that has the potential to reshape the Virginia House of Delegates, it is important that everyone is well-informed about the concerns of each candidate. Leslie and Djuna hope that, through group huddles over the coming months, they can find people who are willing to go out and canvas for Democratic candidates. The goal is to get people excited and actively engaged in the election process. Every single seat is important.
“We are not stuck like this for the next four years,” says Leslie. “Changes aren’t going to happen overnight. Coming together for these events with like-minded people can be very comforting mentally and emotionally.”
She makes an excellent point. For some of us new to the world of activism, shocked into the glaring reality of injustice that still exists—that has always existed beneath the rose-colored glasses of privilege—an overwhelming desire to make the world better for our sisters and friends is coupled with a fear of territory we haven’t explored. Attending meetings like those hosted by the Women’s March on Roanoke allow us to see that many of our neighbors are willing to stand up for equality despite their differences. When people feel that from their community, it inspires them to be brave. It can be in a setting as simple as a postcard writing party.
“[These events] consist of people making connections and having an enjoyable evening. We are absolutely trying to get a message across through the postcards, but it is also about creating camaraderie and support,” she adds.
Leslie and Djuna are involved with other organizations throughout the community like Roanoke Indivisible and Together We Will. They have open communication with the Roanoke City and Roanoke County Democratic Committees. Every action and meeting helps make sure elected officials are held accountable for their decisions and listening to their constituents.
For more information on the Women’s March on Roanoke and how you can get involved, check out their Facebook page: www.facebook.comwomensmarchonroanoke. They update it frequently with ways to stay connected as the movement evolves.

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

Planning for the Future

A young woman searches for a doctor who will let her be in control of her own body

When Christa Poindexter graduated from high school in 2008, she knew that giving birth to children was something that she did not want for her future.
“I remember talking to my first gynecologist, well before I was sexually active, and explaining that I was interested in permanent birth control for when I became sexually active,” she explains. “The doctors look at you like you are crazy.”
For Christa and many other women, this conversation is still difficult to have with medical professionals in the south, predominately in what is considered the “Bible Belt” region. The double standard still exists that, even in your twenties, you are old enough to choose to commit to a child for the rest of your life, but not old enough to decide that you never want to give birth to children.
Four years later, Christa brought it up to her doctor again. She explained that she planned on adopting children when she was ready, something that is desperately needed across the country. Again, her doctor refused to offer any form of permanent birth control.
“She explained that she would not perform the procedure unless her patient was 30 years old or had two to three children, and she preferred three children. It was a shocking thing to me,” Christa says.
This topic became the first that Christa brought up when she visited a new doctor. Even when she moved to more progressive areas, like Philadelphia, she was met with resistance.
“In Philadelphia, a doctor told me she did not want to dismiss it, but that I was simply too young. She told me that it wasn’t that she wanted me to have children, but my age was not what her practice would allow,” she adds. “When I asked if she knew someone who would do it, she said I should try a different form of birth control.”
This suggestion, although perfectly valid for women who seek temporary birth control, was simply not right for Christa. During her first three months on any form of birth control pills, she experienced severe side effects from headaches to hair loss. When she explained these to her first doctor, she suggested a non-hormonal IUD. Until that time, Christa had never experienced cramps with her monthly cycle. Once she had the IUD, her cramps became worse, and her cycle lasted 18 days.
Christa then switched to a hormonal IUD and began having headaches, back aches, and extreme cramps. She experienced weight gain and emotional turmoil. For years, she struggled with each temporary solution offered to her in place of the permanent one she desired. Then, she moved across the country.
When she met with her doctor in California, at age 26, she inquired about a permanent procedure once more. This time, after acknowledging that Christa was young, she followed it up with the truth that rises above a woman’s age or marital status: Christa owns her own body. She should be able to make decisions like this one for herself.
They agreed to a procedure called Tubal Ligation. This can mean different things for different people, but for Christa it meant that her fallopian tubes were removed. She met with the doctor and surgeon thirty days prior to the surgery for an evaluation that made sure she understood what the procedure meant and that she was not forced. By law, her doctor had to go through every single form of birth control verbally as an option. Once Christa refused all of them, they could schedule her surgery.
“All of the changes that I’ve experienced are positive. My monthly cycle is back to normal. I am happier, not moody and crying all the time. My hair isn’t falling out, and I don’t have any weird body changes. I’ve lost weight. It’s all positive for me,” she explains. “I have no scars. They walked me right through it. I have no pain or soreness.”
Christa does say that some women could have scars, and it is important to remember that, like birth control pills or IUDs, side effects can be different for everyone. People who are interested in this procedure should have full discussions with their doctors about options and potential side effects to make the best decision. Of course, based on your age, you may be having that discussion with more than one doctor. Above all, be the best health advocate you can for yourself. It never hurts to get opinions from a few different medical professionals to weigh your options.
You may also want to look at your insurance coverage before scheduling a permanent birth control procedure.
“When I selected my insurance plan with my employer, I noticed that most of them covered sterilization. It was interesting to me to see that they also believed an individual owns their own body, and they wanted to give options for coverage based on that. The surgery was very expensive, but my insurance covered all of it except my copay since I was in the hospital,” Christa says.
Since her procedure, Christa has received both criticism and congratulations. From her critics, Christa is often told the same things her original doctors said almost ten years ago. She is young. She may regret this one day.
Some even revert to talking about how much they love their own children, which is an odd argument to hear from someone else in the context of Christa’s body.
“Of course they love their own children,” she says. “I’m not telling them they shouldn’t, or that I won’t love the children I adopt one day.”
Because, when it all comes down to it, the public outcry that goes into whether a woman can choose permanent birth control seems to far surpass the energy that goes into helping children in foster care or in need of adoption. Christa, who has volunteered through various organizations to help these children, has seen this problem first hand.
“I work with various age groups, and it has made me feel close to them. I don’t have to go through the challenge of birth, that could be detrimental to my health and the health of a baby,” she explains. “At the end of the day, there are children out there already who need love, and I can provide that for them without going through childbirth.”

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

Tackle Reading

We believe that one of the most important things you can foster in your child’s life is a love for reading. It serves as the foundation for developing skills that will serve them in every facet of life. Recently, we were ecstatic to learn that Kathryn Starke, author and native of Richmond, Virginia, is helping parents and educators everywhere achieve that goal.

Starke has experience teaching multiple grades in elementary schools, and served as a literary specialist for over a decade in Richmond and Chesterfield’s public school systems. Her multicultural children’s book, Amy’s Travels, is used in schools in over twenty countries.

Tackle Reading COVER 6x9.inddTackle Reading, her most recent book, combines her expertise with advice from valuable community mentors and resources including NFL players, celebrities, and authors to inspire children, parents, and fellow educators. It includes lesson plans, activities, and guidance to improve literacy for all children.

The impact of this book is just beginning. Thousands of copies of Tackle Reading were donated to inner city elementary schools nationwide thanks to charitable giving and sponsorship. Regardless of your role in a child’s life, it can be a great tool to nurture their love for reading. To purchase your copy and learn more about Starke, visit www.creativemindspublications.com.

The regional magazine for women