Tag Archives: children

Meet the Makers: Minor Terry

Minor Terry started crocheting at the age of five in a friend’s basement. From that time, she could make a square or scarf for anyone who needed it. When YouTube become more prevalent, she was able to watch videos on repeat to figure out how people were holding their hands, and her projects became more intricate, personal, and detailed. Today, she crochets just about everything from fuzzy stuffed animals and stroller blankets to coffee cozies and ear warmers. Her hobby has turned into a small businesses, Crooked Mountain Crafts, and has given her the opportunity to reach more clients with her work. She crochets wherever she goes, and often has more than one project in a bag by her side.

“I can crochet and walk, and I’ve definitely been that person to pull it out at the bar during trivia night,” she laughs. “Anytime we are hanging out with friends, they know I’m going to have a crocheting project.”

  Like many knitters and crocheters, Minor has several projects “on the needles” at any given moment. Although this may seem like a large commitment, the reaction a person has when they receive something she has created makes the entire process worthwhile.

“I sent my sister a blanket, and I asked if she could film one of her friends opening it since I wouldn’t be there to see it. One of my favorite memories is her joy as she unfolded it,” she explains.

In addition to projects of her own choosing, Minor does a lot of custom creations. She’s crocheted blankets with specific colors, patterns, and even sports logos. Recently, a Mets blanket proved to be her most detailed design yet.

“It’s a single stitch, so every single stitch had to be counted and done. I think that was my most challenging piece, but that isn’t to say it wasn’t fun. Once you get into the rhythm of it, it goes pretty quickly,” she says.

Her clients are not limited to purchasing crocheted pieces. Minor’s boyfriend is an arborist, and he has designed copper trees that are available on her Etsy shop and at her craft shows. People use them for Christmas trees, jewelry trees, money trees, and talk pieces. With so many choices available, Crooked Mountain Crafts is a great place to find fun, personalized gifts for the upcoming holiday season.

Minor spends her evenings stitching and making everything she sells, so you know your purchase is made with love and not mass produced. If you still need a gift for someone on your list (or yourself!), be sure to check out her work. You can find Crooked Mountain Crafts at the Kazim Shrine Holiday Arts, Crafts & Vendor Show on December 9 from 10am-2pm, or at www.etsy.com/shop/CrookedMtnCraft.

 

Featured image by Ronnie Lee Bailey

What We’re Reading: Wild

Wild: Endangered Animals in Living Motion (A Photicular Book) shines a spotlight on the mammals, birds, and insects currently threatened with extinction.

With Dan Kainen’s masterful Photicular technology, readers are treated to eight movie-like images of a diverse range of endangered species, including a rare Amur leopard licking its paw, a pair of gorillas at play, a young rhinoceros speeding ahead of its mother, and an elephant bathing in a river. Each scene is paired with an informative profile by science writer Kathy Wollard.

Readers will learn that an albatross can float through cold air currents for hundreds of miles without once flapping its wings, that a leopard can leap about 20 feet into the air, and that there are more than 250 species of bumblebees in existence. They will also learn about the devastating environmental and economic conditions that threaten these animals’ survival, and the steps that conservationists are taking to stop (and in some cases reverse) the damage.

Wild will be available where books are sold on September 5, but you can win a copy over on our Facebook page in August! Stay tuned!

Wishing for Hope– A Little Girl and Her Unicorn

Claire Cordell, a 4-year-old girl battling Ewing’s Sarcoma, received a gift from Unbridled Change on Saturday, May 21 that every child longs for– a magical unicorn.

Unbridled Change is a nonprofit Equine Assisted Therapy center in Boones Mill, Virginia. They provide interactive mental health therapy and Equine Assisted learning for families and veterans. Unbridled Change first heard about Claire’s wish from an email from her mother. Kimberly Cordell reached out to Michelle Holling-Brooks, Founder and Executive Director of Unbridled Change, to see if they could help grant this special wish. Claire was in the middle of treatment for her rare cancer when they received the anticipated response.

Claire began her heroic fight with cancer in September 2015. Her Ewing’s Sarcoma was growing off her nasal clavicle bone and wrapping around her brain stem. Her wish was granted in March 2016 after many efforts to make her wish perfect. The little girl described a specific pink unicorn that lived in the forest with many fairies. She recalled the unicorn’s name to be Sparkle Toes, because of its memorable pink,sparkling hooves.

During her explanation of her wish to Michelle, Claire asked, “Do you know how to talk to the fairies that know unicorns? If you do, can you ask them to use their magic in their horns to take the cancer ball out of my head?”

The task of granting this wish required creativity from many helping hands. They selected a pony named Puzzle to serve as Sparkle Toes. Puzzle was dyed head-to-toe with hot pink non-toxic chemical free semi-permanent dye that a local organic salon, Creekside Salon, helped them find. After 16 bottles of dye, eight bottle of spray dye for the mane and tail, one bottle of glitter for the hooves, and of course the magical horn, Puzzle was transformed into Sparkle Toes!

image3When the day came for Sparkle Toes to meet Claire, she received incredible news from her doctor. The 4-year-old’s cancer was gone and the treatments had worked to heal her back to health. Claire was convinced that Sparkle Toes must have healed her with its magical horn. The unicorn walked into the arena where Claire was patiently waiting and her face lit up with joy.

“Wow, you do know Sparkle Toes! But be careful. Don’t touch her horn, if you do she will lose her magic and not be able to help other people get better and be happy too!” Claire said, with a smile on her face.

Claire spent the next 30 minutes riding Sparkle Toes and talking to the unicorn about her journey with cancer. She knew that Sparkle Toes was going to help more people with its healing horn and never lost her smile during the whole ride. Claire thanked Unbridled Change with her dazzling spirit and everyone else that granted her one special wish.

Unbridled Change’s mission is to help people overcome obstacles that may come up in their lives. Michelle told the family to not use Claire’s official wish on them.

“I love my job, the smiles and hugs we received today from Claire and her family will be with me and our staff for the rest of our lives!” stated Holling-Brooks.

Unbridled Change wanted to do this wish for the little girl because of the complications she has faced in life with cancer. They didn’t receive any compensation for completing her wish and they simply wanted to help Claire overcome trauma. The work they do for people is made possible by the community and local foundations. For those seeking more information about Unbridled Change and their programs can visit www.UnbridledChange.org.

Written by Stacy Shrader

Heels for Healing

If you’re looking for a fun way to celebrate spring and meet new friends, you don’t want to miss Heels for Healing on Friday, April 29 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Berglund Center in Roanoke! This annual women’s fundraiser for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals will feature a shoe raffle with gorgeous footwear from Yarid’s. Wine, heavy hors d’oeuvres, and a cash bar will be available. The event will also include a large silent and live auction.

Tickets to Heels for Healing are $55 each, or $400 for a table of eight. Since its inception, the event has raised thousands of dollars and awareness for local nonprofit children’s hospitals. These funds help provide lifesaving medical equipment and services for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Pediatric Units at Carilion Clinic Children’s Hospital in Roanoke. Each year, over 2,200 hospitalized children and 25,000 children visiting 17 speciality outpatient clinics benefit from the money raised by Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals.

12814617_10154034110948140_1515970955429804959_nThis is possible because 100 percent of funds raised remain locally to enable the hospital to pivoted miracles of health and healing for babies and children in our communities. Every ticket, every pair of shoes, every donation—every single dollar makes a difference.

In previous years, the event has been held during the day. The new hours this year may be more convenient for attendees to relax and enjoy the event—all while doing their part to help children in our community. For more information about this event and how to purchase tickets, visit www.carilionclinic.org/cmn.

Love Your Melon

Some of the most important people in this world are those that go out of their way to help children in need. That’s why we want to recognize the amazing team at Love Your Melon.

Brian_Zach_Superheroes_1280x500_900pxFounded by two friends, Zach and Brian, Love Your Melon has been on a mission to improve the lives of children battling cancer since October 22, 2012. It was founded on the simple concept of putting a hat on every child battling cancer in America. They also sell hats, shirts, and accessories committing fifty percent of net proceeds on every Love Your Melon product sold to the Pinky Swear Foundation and CureSearch.

“On December 18, 2012, we got to go to our first hospital donation event and it was then that we knew how cool this idea was. Seeing the smiles on the kids faces that day was incredible so we kept making the hats,” says co-founder, Zach.

To date, more than 2,500 college students from over 225 different schools across the nation have signed on as ambassadors to sell and donate hats. This includes a group of students at Virginia Tech.

You can help too! Visit www.loveyourmelon.com for more information or to purchase a hat, shirt, or accessory of your own. Portions of the proceeds from your purchase will go to help cancer research initiatives and provide immediate support for families impacted by childhood cancer.

Ten Tips to Make Your Home Safer for Kids

Home is where the heart is, and for most people, it’s where they feel safest. Yet for children, the home isn’t as safe as you might assume. In fact, you may be surprised to learn that 3.5 million children go to the emergency room every year for injuries that happen in homes.
Some parents are unintentionally putting their children at risk by making common mistakes in the home. For example, parents say they are worried about fire safety and 96 percent report they have a smoke alarm, yet 14 percent never check their smoke alarm battery, according to “Report to the Nation: Protecting Children in Your Home,” from Safe KidsWorldwide and Nationwide.
“Parents just can’t imagine a tragedy could happen to them, but it happens far too often,” says Kate Carr, president and CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide. “Sadly, 2,200 kids die from an injury in the home every year. The good news is that we know how to prevent these injuries, and parents can take simple steps to protect their kids.”
Safe Kids Worldwide teamed up with Nationwide and its Make Safe Happen program to help families keep kids safe in the home. “We know parents want to protect their children,” said Terrance Williams, Nationwide’s Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer. “It’s our hope that by bringing this information to families and caregivers, we can help them protect what matters most.”
Here are 10 tips to make your home kid-safe so you avoid preventable injuries. To learn more, visit SafeKids.org or MakeSafeHappen.com.

1. Make sure there is a working smoke alarm and carbon monoxide alarm on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas. Test the batteries every month.

2. Create and practice a home fire-escape plan with your family. Know two ways out of every room in case of a fire.

3. Give young children your full and undivided attention when they are in and around water. Only 1 percent of parents list drowning as a concern, according to the Safe Kids report, yet every week a child dies from drowning in a bathtub.

4. For young children, use safety gates at the top and bottom of the stairs, attaching them to the wall if possible.

5. Keep cribs clear of toys and soft bedding, and make sure that babies sleep alone, on their backs, and in a crib every time they sleep. For children under the age of 1, suffocation is the leading cause of injury-related death.

6. Keep all medicine up and away, out of children’s reach and sight. Think about places where kids get into medicine, like in purses, on counters and on nightstands.

7. Store all household cleaners, liquid laundry packets and other toxic products out of children’s reach and sight. Use cabinet locks to prevent young children from getting into products that may cause them harm.

8. Save the Poison Help line number into your phone and post it in your home where anyone can find it easily in an emergency: 1-800-222-1222.

9. Secure flat-panel TVs by mounting them to the wall and place box-style TVs on a low, stable piece of furniture.

10. Properly install window guards or stops to help prevent falls from windows. Each year, 3,300 children are injured by falling out of a window, yet 70 percent of parents say they have never used window guards or stops that prevent these falls.

Backyard Fun!

backyardWhen summer arrives do you see even less of your kids than you did during the school year? Too many American children, tweens and teens spend those extra hours of free time indoors playing with technology, rather than engaging in healthy outdoor activities. Even when you know where your kids are, you may not understand what they’re doing with all those devices and game controllers.

This summer, why not help your children get excited about a healthy and fun time outdoors? You can make your backyard the neighborhood hotspot that no kid can resist by providing three key ingredients to a great summer: fun, food and friendship.

Fun in the sun

To compete with smartphones, PCs, tablets and other digital devices, you need outdoor excitement – the kind that only water can provide. Installing a backyard pool may not be practical for everyone, but a backyard water slide is a great substitute.

Easy to set up and use, a water slide is a cost-effective way to create outdoor fun this summer. For example, we love H2OGO! backyard water slides for their modern but comfortable products. They feature the Speed Ramp, an inflatable launch pad that creates a smooth belly-flop landing at the start of the superfast 18-foot slide. A Splash Lagoon funnels water throughout the entire slide, reducing friction and increasing speed. Learn more at www.bestway-global.com.

Food for fun

All that water sliding and other fun activity is going to make kids work up an appetite. They’ll need fuel so they can keep having fun. Look for fare that is easy, kid-friendly and nutritious. For example, instead of serving high-fat, high-sugar ice cream, consider frozen fruit or fruit pops. Replace sugary, calorie-laden sodas with flavored water. For kids who crave crunch, replace chips with fresh-cut crisp fruits like apples and kid-friendly veggies such as carrots or cherry tomatoes. You can serve them with a variety of delicious, yogurt-based dips. Whip up a nacho platter that incorporates low-fat shredded cheese, fresh salsa and lean protein like beans or grilled chicken.

Friendship and fun

With your backyard gaining the reputation of the neighborhood hot spot for great food and fun, you may notice some new faces showing up. Encourage children to engage in games that can help them get to know each other and create new friendships with others in the neighborhood.

Some of the simplest games are great ice-breakers. One game that’s great for getting to know each other is to have kids stand in a circle and toss around a bean bag or small ball. The child who throws asks a question – such as “What’s your name?” or “What’s your favorite sport?” – and the child who catches has to answer.

Another fun idea for older children is a biography building circle. Kids sit in a circle and start with one child making a simple statement about himself, such as “I like to play baseball with my dad.” The next child in line adds his or her own information by building off something the first child said, such as “My dad is an airline pilot.” The play continues with children each saying something new that is somehow linked to what the last child said.

Each of these activities will help keep your child healthy and happy this summer. Inspire them to grow and make good choices by fostering outdoor play in your own backyard!

Transform Your Picky Eater!

Few things cause more parental frustration than trying to get a picky eater to enjoy a well-rounded diet. Whether your child has been picky all his life, or, out of nowhere is now turning up his nose at healthy foods he previously adored, it’s easy to feel like your failing as a caregiver.

“I think we need to remember that it is developmentally appropriate for children to not only move in and out of enjoying certain foods, but also to test limits and boundaries with their parents around refusing to eat what we give them,” says Dr. Aimee Gould Shunney, a licensed naturopathic doctor specializing in women’s health and family medicine.

20941719_originalA parent herself, when Shunney’s son goes through phases when he eats only certain things, she tries to remain consistent and optimistic.

“I believe it’s part of my job as a mama to keep a positive tone in my voice as I offer variety, explain the importance of protein for muscles and smarts, and sing the praises of eating a rainbow – even after a full day’s work while going up against a tired first-grader who only wants dessert,” she says. “I think the biggest mistake we make is when we just give up and give in because, well, it can be exhausting.”

To help parents win the food fights and bring peace to the dinner table, Shunney offers five simple ideas for transforming a child with finicky tendencies into an amazing eater with optimal nutrition.

1. Cook more.   Cook for your children and make their dishes simple without lots of sauces and spices. If possible, let them help you cook so they can be part of the fun. Cooking whole unprocessed foods will ensure your family is getting the biggest nutrition bang for your buck. There will be less sodium, sugar, additive and preservatives as well.

2. Eat more veggies.   Present them with choices: Would you like carrots or red peppers? Pickles or olives? Try starting dinner with a raw veggie plate and let your kids select what they want. It’s a healthy appetizer that makes eating whole foods a regular part of the meal routine.
bellaegg

3. Pick your protein.   Find three protein meals your kids like and use them often for dinner and lunches. Peanut butter and jelly should not be an everyday option. Other ideas: Alaskan salmon burgers, organic chicken strips and eating breakfast for dinner that includes a protein like eggs. Choose animal products that are pastured and fed organic feed. If you eat beef, choose grass-fed – this will provide better fats for your children’s development, immune system and cognitive function, as well as help you avoid exposure to chemicals and antibiotics.

4. Supplements.  Supplements are really important for kids – even ones who eat well. A good multivitamin can help bridge the gap for a picky eater. Add in an omega-3 EPA and DHA supplement which has numerous well-researched benefits in areas like childhood immunity, behavior and attention, cognitive function and emotional well-being. Try a vitamin D supplement – 400 I.U. for breast-fed infants, 500 I.U. from 1-3 years old, 800 I.U. from 4-8 years old, and 1300 I.U. from 9-18 years old.

5. Show them. Teach them good eating habits by modeling good eating habits. Share your favorite foods. Sit down at the table and eat. Love your veggies. Relish your protein. Don’t overdo it on starch. Take it easy on dessert. Drink water. Enjoy your food.

“We often take health and nutrition way too seriously and it stops being any fun. I believe that eating food is one of the supreme joys of life, particularly when it’s eaten with people you love!” says Shunney. “Planning meals, preparing food, eating it together while talking and laughing – even the clean up – can all be fun if we make that our intention. The more fun it is, the more our kids will want to participate, and the more they do that, the more engaged they will be around food and family.”