Tag Archives: DIY

Tea Bag Treatment

Everyone loves their beauty sleep. But sometimes, no matter how long you rest, or how well you sleep, you wake up with dark, puffy (even swollen) circles under your eyes.

Dark circles are very common. They are due to leaky capillaries – small blood vessels, surrounding the eye, that break and then nest under the skin under your eyes. Yes, it’s harmless, but it can make you look aged and feel insecure, affecting your mood and self-esteem.

So, here’s a quick DIY to get your face back to beautiful.  A very popular (and effective!) method is the tea bag treatment. Grab tea bags with lots of caffeine, as well as antioxidants – the caffeine removes excessive moisture, and the antioxidants soothe the skin. (Green or black tea are good choices to roll with.)

Use the tea bags for your tea, then place them in plastic bags and refrigerate them overnight. You want the tea bags very cool when you use them. Cooler temperature reduces redness and puffiness. Lie down comfortably, and place the tea bags over your eyes.

Make sure they are covering the affected areas under your eyes. Leave them on your eyes for about 15 minutes. Repeat as often as you wish – or until you see results. Remember to swap out used tea bags for fresh ones.

Good way to feel beautiful and refreshed – and use your tea for something other than as your beverage!

 

Sip in Style

Hand-painted wine glasses are the trendy DIY project this season and are perfect gifts for any occasion including birthdays, bridal showers, and many other holidays.

All you need are small bottles of acrylic paint, small to medium paint brushes, a plain wine glass, and an index card.  I recommend purchasing quality wine glasses because dollar-glasses tend to break even if you’re not the Hulk, and you certainly wouldn’t want to break your work of art!

Before you begin, draw the design on the index card or print out a design from your computer.  This trick is especially handy for names.

Directions:

1)  Ensure that your glass is clean and dry.

2)  Tape the index card with your design to the inside of the glass.

3)  Load your brush and begin painting the glass, carefully tracing over your design.  (Practice using your paintbrushes on a spare sheet of paper to see the full range of strokes.)

4)  Allow the glass to dry for 1 hour.

5)  Place the glass in a COLD oven, and then preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  The bake time is 30 minutes, but remember to add the preheat time into the bake time.  Leave the glass in the oven until it’s completely cool.

6)  Voila!  A customized, hand-painted, unique work of art.

For simple designs, polka-dots are versatile (not to mention easy), swirls are always stylish and animal prints are chic.  Complex designs such as flowers and animals can be tricky, so practice on paper before painting the glass.  Note that acrylic paint dries quickly but it’s forgiving when wet, so if you make a mistake, have damp paper towels or Q-tips on hand for a quick clean-up.  Don’t forget to decorate the stem!  If you don’t want to paint it, a pretty ribbon quickly adds that final, feminine touch.

Of course, this DIY project isn’t limited to wineglasses!  Try painting margarita glasses, stemless wine glasses, and martini glasses.

 

Home Grown Herbs

While vegetables are the most popular container plants and flowers the prettiest (although not as useful), herb gardens can be both beautiful and delicious.

When deciding which plants you’d like in your herb garden, look first at the herbs you know and use the most (perhaps the most empty jar in your spice rack), but don’t limit yourself to that. You can look up herbs online (try Annette’s Herb Garden) and see which are most commonly used or simply go to your local nursery and pick out the ones that smell the best.

Here five of the most popular uses and some gardening tips (in order of my favorite to least favorite):

Rosemary – First, it’s delicious. It also dried wonderfully and can be used indoors. If you plant this herb, consider harvesting an entire stem at one time, freezing it, and using it as a skewer later.

Basil – Also, delicious. There are many varieties of basil so it is very customizable, but make sure to break off a leaf and smell it before you buy it. This herb likes a lot of water, but be careful because it can mildew.

Mint – My parents’ favorite use for mint is in a mojito, but we use it in several other things as well (probably because of, again, the bush). Be careful about controlling your mint. You can also pinch the buds off to keep it from cross-pollinating.

Thyme – This herb is great because it requires minimal watering and can grow little, purple flowers. However, it tends to get “woody” and may have to be replaced every couple of years.

Sage – Also needs to be replaced (usually every three years), but dries easily. It does, however require a lot of maintenance to keep it from getting “woody” too soon.

Of this list, thyme tends to be the least used (such a shame considering the wealth of puns it opens itself up to, of which I am resisting). If you’re thinking about planting thyme or even have thyme in your garden, but lack ideas, check out Home Cooking.

Lastly, here are just a few tips to maintaining a happy, healthy, herb garden:

Herbs need full sun, but don’t like to be cooked. Use good quality soil so the plants can drain properly. Go easy on the fertilizer or don’t bother with it at all. And finally, don’t be afraid to harvest a lot at once. The herbs are truly happier this way and you deserve to reap what you sow!