Tag Archives: eating healthy

Getting Back on Track

I have a confession.

In 2015, somewhere between the trappings of convenient fast food and a juicer that was painstakingly complicated to clean, I found myself growing more comfortable with visiting my oldest and most faithful friend: the drive-thru.
I am not a huge sweets person, nor do I drink soft drinks. I thought I was safe by choosing chicken and the smaller order of fries (after all, a girl should indulge every now and then). At first, the only real difference I noticed was that my jeans were getting a little tighter. Gradually, however, I began to notice an increased sluggishness. I did my best to tackle it with more caffeine and ignore the old familiar side effects of a diet high in fats, preservatives, and other chemicals.
I’m not proud of it, but with a jam-packed schedule, it was just easier. And it would have continued, but two things saved me:

  1. root-617409_1920The official “push” was that I brought in the New Year with a cold.
    For me, juicing ginger is a healthy and inexpensive way to combat “the sniffles.” I don’t always have time to visit the doctor, and I’m not a huge fan of antibiotics when they aren’t necessary. So, I bought another juicer that is easier to clean and use. I’ve been juicing ginger, apples, carrots, cucumbers, and pears for two weeks now. In addition to eating better,  juicing and taking vitamins has helped me make sure my body has the nutrients it needs. Not only is my cold gone, but I’ve dropped a few inches from my waistline. I also have more energy.
  2. Now that I feel better, sticking to juicing isn’t always appealing. You may have noticed our new minimalism section in the January issue. As I explore the concept of minimalism, I am noticing that the discipline it requires is positively influencing other aspects of my life. Ultimately, eating healthy is a lifestyle change to which you must fully commit in order to benefit from and enjoy. I only bring good things that inspire joy into my home. There is no reason that I shouldn’t treat my body the same way.

I know there will be days when fast food creeps back into my life, but my goal is to make sure that it never becomes a habit again. This way of life is far more rewarding, and I wouldn’t trade the extra energy I have at the end of the day for anything I can get from the drive-thru window–even a small order of fries!

 

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

Pick up our January issue for more reasons to love minimalism, easy ways to eat healthy, and tips for staying active in cold weather! 

Have a Riot: The Anti-Diet

Written by Beth Herman

Winter will not give us a break! Noses that drip and stuffed up ears. Fevers that reach 102 degrees, and pink eye that requires two prescriptions and three weeks to relent. An impassable driveway. Temperatures below 40 degrees three weeks in a row. Snow, snow and more snow. But the most annoying thing about this endless winter?  The hash it’s made of my running schedule.

running

I’m an unimpressive runner.  Very slow, I stop to use the bathroom every 20 – 30 minutes, get lapped by runners younger and fitter, and passed by those larger and older. I’m not winning medals or breaking any records.But so what! Running makes me feel like a rock star; strong and lean, and I drop it into conversation every chance I get.

Quite simply, I am in love with running. Thrilled with my increased energy level, I adore the couple of uninterrupted hours it gives my husband and me to talk every other morning.  Most importantly, running has kept me fit without the stress of dieting, which is not easy at 51 years old.

What this involves is a shift of perspective. Instead of obsessing about what that brownie, cupcake or extra helping of mashed potatoes will add on the scale, think instead of how what you eat affects your workouts.  You don’t have to run marathons. Walking, Nia, or tennis will do. Thinking of yourself as an athlete, your food choices are filtered through that lens. I want those cookies but I am not supposed to have them, becomes, I need to eat some turkey to properly fuel myself for my workout in an hour.

 

Negativity and denial, dangerous issues when it comes to weight, are removed from the equation. Here are some ideas:

1)      Allow yourself to fall in love; cultivate an interest in walking, running, yoga, or nia.  Read everything you can on the activity, as if you were preparing to learn knitting, Spanish cooking or bird watching.

2)      It’s never too late to start. I didn’t begin running until my mid forties.

3)      Take ego, appearance and weight out of it. Thoughts like, “I have to do this because it will help me to lose weight,” are negative. Do your regular workout as a result of your commitment to the activity.

4)      Begin with baby steps: I started out running up and down my driveway, now I can go up to 90 minutes at a time.

tennisshoes

5)      Find a mentor. People enjoy helping others pursue a shared passion. My guru was a single woman 21 years my junior. An accomplished runner who had run every U.S. marathon at least twice, she came to my neighborhood once a week, keeping me laughing and distracted as we hauled up the hills of my development. She lives in Europe now with her husband and new baby.These days when we get together it’s over a meal and a glass of wine- and I don’t even count the calories!

 

In addition to being a runner, Beth Herman is an artist and essayist.