Tag Archives: extraordinary women

Women’s History Month: Notable Women Inductees in the National Inventors Hall of Fame

Women’s History Month: Notable Women Inductees in the National Inventors Hall of Fame

Since the founding of the National Inventors Hall of Fame® (NIHF), nearly 550 innovators have been honored for their contributions to making our world a better place through their patented inventions. In conjunction with Women’s History Month in March, NIHF celebrates the accomplishments of women Inductees in the Hall of Fame.

NIHF is Inducting three women inventors in its 2018 Class. On May 3, Sumita Mitra (Nanocomposite Dental Materials), Jacqueline Quinn (Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron), and Mary Engle Pennington (Food Preservation and Storage) will be Inducted as part of The Greatest Celebration of American Innovation®.

(l to r: Jaqueline Quinn, Mary Engle Pennington, Sumita Mitra)

Other notable past women Inductees include:

Mary Anderson, Windshield Wiper (1866-1953; Inducted in 2011)  While touring New York City in a trolley car on a snowy day in the early 1900s, Anderson conceived her idea of a windshield wiper blade that could be operated from the inside by the trolley driver. Her idea consisted of a lever inside the vehicle that controlled a spring-loaded arm with a rubber blade. With her 1903 patent, Anderson’s invention proved to be the first windshield-clearing device to be effective.

Frances Arnold, Directed Evolution of Enzymes (Inducted in 2014)  Arnold is a pioneer of directed evolution, a process for “breeding” scientifically interesting or technologically useful proteins by mutating and recombining their DNA sequences and screening for desired properties. Arnold’s methods are used for developing new biological routes to making pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals, consumer chemicals and biofuels.

Stephanie Kwolek, Kevlar® Fiber (1923-2014; Inducted in 1995)  Thousands of police officers and armed forces members can attest to the value of Kwolek’s breakthrough research in para-aramid fibers. The fruits of her work can be found in lightweight bullet-resistant vests, mooring ropes, fiber-optic cables, aircraft parts and canoes. Kevlar is a polymer fiber five times stronger than the same weight of steel.

Frances Ligler, Portable Optical Biosensors (Inducted in 2017)  A biosensor is a device using biological molecules to detect a chemical or biological target. Ligler is recognized for her innovative application of emerging technologies in a variety of fields to make optical biosensors smaller, more versatile and more automated. Thanks to her work, biosensors have moved out of the laboratory and into use for food safety, disease diagnosis, pollution control and homeland security.

More information on Inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame is available at www.invent.org/honor/ .

About the National Inventors Hall of Fame
The National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF) is the premier nonprofit organization in America dedicated to recognizing inventors and invention, promoting creativity, and advancing the spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship. Founded in 1973 in partnership with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, NIHF is committed to not only honoring the individuals whose inventions have made the world a better place, but to ensuring American ingenuity continues to thrive in the hands of coming generations through its national, hands-on educational programming and collegiate competitions focused on the exploration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The National Inventors Hall of Fame Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate. For more information, visit invent.org. To nominate an inventor for Induction, visitinvent.org/nominate.

Profile: Melissa Aldana

Tenor saxophonist Melissa Aldana will perform at the Jefferson Center on February 17 at 7 pm and again at 9 pm. A rising tenor saxophone star, Aldana recently released her second trio album (and fourth as a leader). “Back Home” unveils a powerful musical creation by Aldana and her illustrious bandmates. Not so much reminiscent of a specific place, “Back Home” evokes something a little deeper for Aldana.

“Back Home is a tribute to Sonny Rollins, who has been a huge influence on me since I was ten years old,” she explains. “It makes a reference to the first time I heard him playing back home in Chile. I completely fell in love with the sound of his tenor. He is organic and funny. Those are some of the most important elements in music. It’s like he’s having a conversation with you, and you can hear how he’s taking risks and trying new things. Those are the elements I want to have in my own playing.”

Aldana describes her relationship with the tenor saxophone as a lifelong commitment. The journey with the instrument has allowed her to mature as an artist, and her dedication to it remains. From New York to Montreal (and around the world), she carries that pivotal moment when she first heard Sonny Rollins play with her in addition to the lessons she has learned from other artistic influences. In this way, she can allow the music she creates to tell the story of her travels, experiences, and personal growth.

On “Back Home” she includes a track called “Time” that is a “meditation on her life since departing Chile.” She has described the nostalgic track as a reflection of the last nine years of her life. As the tenor saxophone carries the listener through the ups and downs of the accumulated time, it is not hard to give over the memories of one’s own adventures. This is exactly the impact Aldana hopes to have with her work.

“I hope [the audience] has fun and goes on a trip with the music. Also, I hope they enjoy it as much as I did when I recorded the album,” she adds.

Joining Aldana for her February 17 show are Sam Harris on the piano, Thomas Crane on the drums, and Pablo Menares on the bass. Together, they project an “uncommonly full orchestral sound, rich in spiritual intensity, all in the absence of a harmony instrument.” The experience is one that Roanoke audiences are unlikely to forget, and Aldana is excited to introduce both new and returning fans to her new music.

To purchase tickets, visit www.jeffcenter.org. For more information on Melissa Aldana and how to purchase her music, go to www.melissaaldana.com.

New Staff at Jefferson Surgical Clinic!

Jefferson Surgical Clinic has a commitment to providing patients with exemplary health care. For that reason, we always take interest when they hire new staff. The latest additions to their team are no exception to their commitment. We are excited to introduce you to these two extraordinary women!

Christin Clark has been promoted to Nurse Practitioner upon completing a M.S. in Nursing in the Family Nurse Practitioner program at Jefferson College of Health Sciences in the spring of 2017. She will see patients in JSC’s vascular clinic, where she has worked as an R.N. supervisor since 2014.

Susan K. Blick has joined Jefferson Surgical Clinic as an advanced-level certified family nurse practitioner. She will be joining Dr. Gregory Zachmann in providing patent care at Jefferson Surgical’s ENT department. Blick relocated to Roanoke from Macon, Georgia where she spent 14 years as a nurse practitioner.

For more information, or to make an appointment with Christin Clark or Susan Blick, call 540.283.6000.