Tag Archives: farmers

Profile: Cedar Rush Farm

Cedar  Rush Farm

Two first-generation farmers find a place to pursue their passions

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

Soil health and community are at the heart of Cedar Rush Farm. The two first-generation farmers, Fain and Kyle, may be new to the farming business, but they are eager to learn about sustainable practices. From honeybees to low-till methods, they are not only concerned with production, but also with their long-term impact on the environment. 

Their mutual love and respect for the land has helped create a place where both farmers’ dreams can flourish. Kyle, who grew up in Craig County, attended culinary school, but always knew he wanted to do something with the four acres of his family’s land that were not being used. Until recently, he wasn’t sure when or if starting the farm was possible. Then, a few years ago, he met Fain while working at an outdoor adventure camp. Fain had just switched jobs, and found that combining her love of working with people with a physically demanding routine suited her better than her previous role in the mental health field. Soon after, Kyle and Fain decided to merge their passions for food and inspiring joy and wellness in others to create Cedar Rush Farm.

“I really enjoy adding back to the earth and the soil,” explains Fain. “That should be the basis of any farming and you can do it most with regenerative practices. I did an apprenticeship at an organic market garden in North Carolina last year, and then we plunged into it.”

One of Fain’s main goals is to reconnect people with nature and their food source. She requests feedback from customers, and enjoys sharing information with both families and restaurants regarding seasonal availability, new vegetables, and more.

“Knowledge is power, and we want to empower people to ask questions, get to know us, and know where their food comes from” says Fain. “We would both love for this to be our full-time career. Coming to the market even when the weather is poor or signing up for our Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) share will be a huge support for us.”

“It’s hard, because all these big farms have access to farm loans, but we just don’t have the experience. Getting that experience is hard without the tools we need. It’s kind of like when you graduate college without any experience, and you need a job to get the experience, but you need experience to get the job,” she adds.

You can support Cedar Rush Farm by visiting them at the Salem Farmers Market every Saturday morning until November. They are also at the West End Community Market on Tuesdays from 3-6pm. Their CSA program is a great way to pick up vegetables during the week if you can’t make it to one of their market times. 

For up-to-date information on their location, and how to sign up for a CSA, visit their Facebook page, www.facebook.com/cedarrushfarm. Tell them Bella sent you!

 

Hayleigh is a freelance writer, independent author, and writing consultant. In 2017, she published her first novel, The Huntsman: A modern retelling of Red Riding Hood. She spends a lot of time traveling and exploring new regions for inspiration, but Roanoke will always be her home. www.hayleighworgan.com.

Totally Selfish Reasons to Practice Sustainability

Okay, so unpopular opinion time: I love the idea of trying to save the planet, but when it comes right down to it, I typically make decisions that are most convenient for me.

When I started working for the Hybrid Electric Vehicle Team (HEVT), I made more of an effort to keep the environment in mind when making daily decisions. I found that practicing sustainability didn’t just help the environment, it also made my life much easier.

Don’t believe me? Here are three totally selfish reasons to practice sustainability:

vtgreen31) More space
Do you know what DOESN’T maximize space in your apartment? The ten thousand plastic grocery bags sitting on your washer and dryer. Carrying a reusable grocery bag immediately solves this problem (and HEVT gives these away for free, so if you need one hit us up). Also, most reusable grocery bags carry more groceries than plastic bags, which means less trips from the car. As for the stack of plastic bags already robbing you of your closet space? Micah’s Backpack and other organizations collect plastic bags so they can use them when packaging food for donation.

2) Money money money (monaaayyyy)
Even with gas prices going down, I still get that sinking feeling when the numbers at the pump go up and I can picture my balance at the bank going down. Opting to walk or take the bus a few times a week can make a large difference. If you are in the market for a new car, hybrids have been proven to save consumers money over time. Unplugging items such as coffee makers when you are not using them can also cut down electricity costs, which creates less of a burden on the environment.

3) Locally-grown food tastes better
Buying local is a good idea all around. Less travel means less pollution and gas consumption. Supporting local business means keeping money in the community. Seeing where your food comes gives you control over what hormones do and do not enter your body. But the biggest reason I buy local? It tastes So. Much. Better. Nothing can compete with a tomato picked fresh off the vine.

vtgreen1Written by Sara Lepley, the communication manager of the Hybrid Electric Vehicle Team of Virginia Tech (HEVT). HEVT competes against 16 other universities in a four year competition in which they transform a 2016 Chevrolet Camaro into a hybrid electric vehicle. Their two headline sponsors, General Motors and the Department of Energy, challenge HEVT to reduce petroleum usage and greenhouse gas effects, while maintaining safety, performance and customer acceptability. They also help in mind cost and innovation. This is Sara’s second year on the team.