Tag Archives: loan

Member One: Credit Score Quick Guide

It’s one of the most important numbers linked to your identity: your credit score. But are you fully aware of why it’s so significant, and what constitutes a good credit score? Read on for a brief explanation of what it is and tips for improving it.

What is it? Your credit score is a number that ranges from 300 to 850 and, along with repayment history, is an indication of your creditworthiness. Anything above 700 is generally viewed as good credit and signals to potential lenders that you’re more likely to pay back your debts on time.

Why should I care? A credit score helps determine whether you’re approved or denied for a credit card or loan and your interest rate. On-time payments have a big impact on your score, and just one or two late payments can significantly lower it. If you’ve ever had a bill go to collections, declared bankruptcy, or had a foreclosure, your score will go down. The number of loans in your name matter and the more accounts you have (in good standing), the better, because it shows that multiple lenders have approved you.

How do I find out my score? The three major credit-reporting agencies—Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion—are required by law to provide you with a free credit report every 12 months. Keep in mind that this is just the report and not the actual score. In order to receive your score, you typically have to purchase it. Visit MyFICO.com to buy your official FICO score. Also, check your monthly credit card statement as some lenders now include your credit score as an added service.

What are some quick ways to improve it? One of the best ways is to consistently pay your bills on time. Other ways include paying down a credit card balance to improve your utilization rate, and keeping lines of credit open with zero balances. Both of these strategies show lenders that you’re able to manage debt and aren’t biting off more than you can chew.

As a general rule of thumb, you should review your credit report along with your score at least once a year. Not only is it beneficial to keep yourself informed and aware, it could help protect against fraud or identity theft.

Presented by Member One Federal Credit Union

 

Home Buying and Renovation Budget Prep

So, you want to buy a house. Or, you’re considering a renovation. Looking at homes and upgrades is exciting, but don’t get ahead of yourself. While HGTV makes it look easy, purchasing a home or getting a second mortgage actually takes a lot of planning and preparation. Here are a few ways to get yourself ready:

Know your budget. You should spend no more than 25-28 percent of your monthly take-home income on a mortgage. Look at your monthly paychecks (after taxes) to see what that percentage would be so you aren’t looking at homes out of your price range. If you’re considering a home equity product (also know as a second mortgage), make sure the extra monthly expense keeps you in that 25-28 percent range.

Save the right amount. Traditionally, your down payment should be 20 percent of the purchase price to avoid paying more in interest and private mortgage insurance (PMI). If the home you want is $200,000, you should have $40,000 saved. Additionally, be prepared to pay closing costs, an inspection fee, appraisal fee, and a lender’s fee. There are loans that don’t require 20 percent down, but you’ll pay more in interest over time and PMI could be required.

Plan for future costs. If you have enough money to comfortably buy a home now, don’t forget about future expenses. Are you planning on starting a family soon? According to the USDA, a middle-income married couple spends an average of $727 a month on a child. Can your budget handle that with a mortgage? What if something breaks? You’re now responsible for home repairs and must plan for those unexpected expenses.

Home Equity Loans or Line of Credit. These options are for people who already own a home; they can be used for renovations, college costs, or even a vacation. When choosing a lender, you’ll want to look at their closing costs, interest rates, and fees. You should also consider if you want a lump sum up front (home equity loan) or a revolving loan that works like a credit card (home equity line of credit). And keep in mind that you’re essentially adding to your mortgage payment, so make sure you’re financially prepared.

Buying or making upgrades to a home should be exciting, but don’t let the thrill of the hunt overshadow the financial preparation. Do your homework and get your ducks in a row; when you’re ready, your dream house will be there.

Presented by Member One Federal Credit Union