Tag Archives: organic

Profile: Cedar Rush Farm

Cedar  Rush Farm

Two first-generation farmers find a place to pursue their passions

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

Soil health and community are at the heart of Cedar Rush Farm. The two first-generation farmers, Fain and Kyle, may be new to the farming business, but they are eager to learn about sustainable practices. From honeybees to low-till methods, they are not only concerned with production, but also with their long-term impact on the environment. 

Their mutual love and respect for the land has helped create a place where both farmers’ dreams can flourish. Kyle, who grew up in Craig County, attended culinary school, but always knew he wanted to do something with the four acres of his family’s land that were not being used. Until recently, he wasn’t sure when or if starting the farm was possible. Then, a few years ago, he met Fain while working at an outdoor adventure camp. Fain had just switched jobs, and found that combining her love of working with people with a physically demanding routine suited her better than her previous role in the mental health field. Soon after, Kyle and Fain decided to merge their passions for food and inspiring joy and wellness in others to create Cedar Rush Farm.

“I really enjoy adding back to the earth and the soil,” explains Fain. “That should be the basis of any farming and you can do it most with regenerative practices. I did an apprenticeship at an organic market garden in North Carolina last year, and then we plunged into it.”

One of Fain’s main goals is to reconnect people with nature and their food source. She requests feedback from customers, and enjoys sharing information with both families and restaurants regarding seasonal availability, new vegetables, and more.

“Knowledge is power, and we want to empower people to ask questions, get to know us, and know where their food comes from” says Fain. “We would both love for this to be our full-time career. Coming to the market even when the weather is poor or signing up for our Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) share will be a huge support for us.”

“It’s hard, because all these big farms have access to farm loans, but we just don’t have the experience. Getting that experience is hard without the tools we need. It’s kind of like when you graduate college without any experience, and you need a job to get the experience, but you need experience to get the job,” she adds.

You can support Cedar Rush Farm by visiting them at the Salem Farmers Market every Saturday morning until November. They are also at the West End Community Market on Tuesdays from 3-6pm. Their CSA program is a great way to pick up vegetables during the week if you can’t make it to one of their market times. 

For up-to-date information on their location, and how to sign up for a CSA, visit their Facebook page, www.facebook.com/cedarrushfarm. Tell them Bella sent you!

 

Hayleigh is a freelance writer, independent author, and writing consultant. In 2017, she published her first novel, The Huntsman: A modern retelling of Red Riding Hood. She spends a lot of time traveling and exploring new regions for inspiration, but Roanoke will always be her home. www.hayleighworgan.com.

Earth Girl Wellness – What’s a GMO?

What’s a GMO?

Written by Tina Hatcher, Earth Girl Wellness

Food manufacturers praise their products as Non-GMO. A television commercial portrays Triscuits as “Nongenemodiscuit.” So what’s with the Non-GMO trend? Is it worth our interest since most food marketing departments have long tried to lure us in with fancy wording to entice us to buy their product? Especially since many of these marketing ploys are only vain attempts to make a product inaccurately sound healthier? Earth Girl thinks the Non-GMO marketing trend is worth the added effort.

GMOs are “Genetically Modified Organisms.” Essentially natural food items (fruits and vegetables) have their genetic material altered to create a newer, “healthier” version of the food. Take corn for example. One species of corn has a piece of its genetic material taken and inserted into another species of corn to make it more resistant to drought, torrential rain, bugs, or undernourished soil. The new version of corn is then easier to grow in harsh conditions, creating higher crop production and lowering cost. Sounds great, doesn’t it? Cross-breeding of crops has been done for centuries to create similar results. So what’s so bad about that? Cross-breeding is a naturally occurring event. A farmer can put two similar breeds of corn together to make a new breed. Genetically modifying the corn is a scientific process occurring in a laboratory; two unrelated species are forced to combine. Think of it like this: You can create a new breed of dog by allowing natural puppy love to occur or you can create a “Frankenpup” by taking an eye from one and a leg from another.

As a point of debate, most of these new species are created to help bolster food supplies in challenging environments. Unfortunately, food executives have also used the technology to make a maximum amount of profit from their products. Most of the products containing GMO ingredients are of such poor quality, we shouldn’t eat them. But let’s push the point a little bit. What other ramifications can come from GMO products? Not a single GMO product can be labeled as organic and can’t really attest to the health of the nutrition or the potential harshness of the product to the land. There is not a single long term study which can validate the safety of these products. GMOs may not have dramatic effects on the current generation but can side effects show up in our children or our children’s children? Additionally, GMOs can ultimately eradicate normally occurring species of many fruits or vegetables. Cross pollination can occur across GMO farm and organic farms that are literally miles apart.

So how can you know if your food is safely free from GMOs? The most commonly genetically modified crops today are corn and soy. These are found in virtually every packaged product on the supermarket shelf! Earth Girl highly recommends putting any GMO product back on the shelf. Look for the Non-GMO Verified Green Seal of Approval and buy organic when possible. For more information on GMOs, go to The Non-GMO Project at www.nongmoproject.org.

For more info about Earth Girl Wellness, visit here.