Tag Archives: recipe

Warm Up to Veggie-Packed Soup

When the weather outside is frightful, we could all use a cozy soup for supper. A steaming bowl of Rustic Vegetable-Beet Soup provides instant comfort.

The ease and convenience of Aunt Nellie’s pickled beets can’t be “beet”- no need to spend time peeling or pickling. This colorful mix of antioxidant-rich beets, sweet potato, and carrots joins tender zucchini to create a soup that tastes like it simmered all afternoon; but in fact, comes together in under an hour. The sweet-tangy beets add an unexpected but welcome layer of flavor to this hearty soup.

For the finishing touch, a garnish of vibrant green, lemony gremolata brightens the soup’s flavor. Garlic, lemon and parsley may seem ordinary, but they come alive when combined. Crisp flatbread makes a perfect accompaniment to this meal-in-a-bowl.

For more recipes, or to learn more about Aunt Nellie’s beets and other products, visit www.AuntNellies.com.

 

Rustic Vegetable-Beet Soup
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 30 minutes
Servings: 6

1          jar (16 ounces) Aunt Nellie’s Whole Pickled Beets, well drained
2          tablespoons olive oil
2          medium onions, coarsely chopped
2          medium carrots, coarsely chopped
1          medium sweet potato, peeled and chopped
2          large cloves garlic, minced
2          zucchini (about 5 ounces each), coarsely chopped
2          cans (about 14 ounces each) vegetable broth
1          teaspoon seasoned salt, optional
1          can (15.5 ounces) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
Salt and pepper
2          tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley
2          tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill

 

Gremolata:

1          tablespoon minced fresh parsley
1          tablespoon minced fresh dill
2          cloves garlic, minced
1          teaspoon grated lemon peel

Coarsely chop beets; set aside.

In large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add onions; saute about 5 minutes or until softened. Add carrots, sweet potato and garlic. Saute 3-5 minutes or until vegetables begin to soften, stirring occasionally.

Add zucchini, broth and seasoned salt, if desired. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, about 15 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add chickpeas; heat through. Season to taste with salt and pepper, as desired. Stir in parsley and dill. Stir in beets. Serve immediately topped with gremolata, if desired.
To make gremolata, combine all ingredients.

Nutrition information per serving (1/6 of recipe): 210 calories; 6 g fat; 6 g protein; 33 g carbohydrate; 6 g dietary fiber; 0 mg cholesterol; 2 mg iron; 727 mg sodium; 0.13 mg thiamin; 6981 IU vitamin A;  8 mg vitamin C.

 

Source: Seneca Foods

 

A Recipe for Comfort (from Well Fed Farm)

Well, I am hoping everyone made it through the holiday season with minimum trauma and maximum enjoyment. While I am not big on proclaiming resolutions, I am a proponent of taking stock and putting everything in order for the days, and year to come. One of my favorite parts of doing this out here on the farm is seed catalog time! When I finally get a chance to grab the big stack of catalogs that have been trickling in from the mailbox, my garden notebook from the season before, a few pens, a hot cup of milky homemade chai, a small bowl of popcorn, and then make my way to the sheepskin covered couch I am prepared to settle in and breath everything else out. As the big red woodstove burns through another round of locust inside the farmhouse and just through the window I can see the garden all tucked in and dormant, I am in my happy place. Oh, the possibilities.

img_2272While I do save many types of seeds year to year (there is an ox-heart type tomato that came from a friend years back, known simply as “Orange-It’s So Good!”) the excitement of new varieties has a hypnotic pull and I know I am not alone here. Sometimes it’s tracking down that elusive variety you sampled the summer before: a tomato that woo-ed you or those perfectly salty pan-fried Shishito peppers you cooked up after bringing them home from the farmers’ market. Other times it’s adding a vegetable variety just for the novelty of it. Mexican Sour Gherkin cucumber, anyone? (BTW they are not truly cucumbers and totally worth growing because they are adorable, as well as, delicious). The magic, and its ensuing promise is all there inside these catalog pages full of images and convincing descriptions. There’s the gorgeous scarlet colored Rouge Vif D’Etampes pumpkins, the ever sexy and otherworldly looking Tardivo radicchio with it’s deep burgundy white ribbed leaves, and the early ripening Liebesapfel sweet pepper with it’s lovely ruffled shape. I always end up circling more than I could ever realistically plant, grow, and harvest.

Flipping through these pages and circling the garden workhorses along with the “well, why not give it a try?” choices reminds me of why I do what I do.  Dreaming of all those fresh meals that lie ahead and all the folks you look forward to sharing them with is good winter cheer indeed. As I hear the kids stomping ice off their boots on the front porch and gaze out at the beautiful belted cattle standing around the round bale hay feeder looking like dusted sugar cookies in the snow I feel grateful indeed.

img_1458Stove Top Duck Fat Popped Corn
with Sumac, citrus zest, and Nutritional yeast
(Serves 4-6)

1 ¼ cup quality popcorn kernels
¼ plus 1 Tbsp. rendered duck fat*
Zest of one half (well rinsed) orange or zest of one full clementine*
Several healthy pinches of sumac*, nutritional yeast*, + salt

Method: Melt 1 tablespoon of duck fat in a small container and set aside. Set a tall, heavy bottomed stockpot over high heat. Add remaining ¼ cup duck fat and swirl pot to keep fat moving as it melts. Once melted, add in popcorn kernels all at once and cover pot with lid. Using a kitchen towel to hold the stockpot by a handle, begin to shake it gently keeping the bottom of the pot on your burner. Very soon you should begin to hear the corn start to pop. Keep moving the pan every ten seconds or so. The pops will start to speed up and then begin slowing back down. This all only takes 2 minutes or so. Listen for the popping to taper off and then immediately pull the pot over to another cool burner and remove lid. Pour popped corn into a large bowl or clean paper bag and add remaining tablespoon melted fat along with sumac, zest, salt, and yeast. Give a few good shakes and taste, adding more sumac or salt as you please.

Notes:
Yes, I am the type of gal that takes having various fats on hand for cooking as serious business. No ball dropping allowed here. I usually have farmstead lard, rendered duck fat, and raw cultured butter in the fridge at all times. Not to worry though, if your shop doesn’t stock duck fat plenty of online retailers these days do or you can substitute coconut oil, grape seed oil, or even saved bacon fat!

~Please use this recipe as a guide and adjust measurements + ingredients as necessary.~ 

Use organic citrus if possible. A Microplane rasp makes zesting a breeze. Sumac, which imparts a tangy tart and (to me) entirely moreish aspect to the popcorn, can be found at an ethnic grocery store. Nutritional yeast can be found in bulk at your local co-op or online. It is a powerhouse of B vitamins and is NOT the same as brewers yeast. I use Himalayan pink salt.

Written by Aaren Nuñez 

An Indulgent Treat That’s Both Salty & Sweet

The holiday season is in full swing, and at this point your calendar is bursting with fun, festive activities: the Nutcracker, a friend’s Ugly Sweater Party, holiday gatherings at the Hotel Roanoke, you name it! If you need an easy recipe for a holiday treat that is guaranteed to impress your guests without much fuss, we have the perfect fix for you: Country Crack!

You will need:
Cooking spray
35-40 saltine crackers
2 sticks (1 cup) of butter (For crunchier crackers, just use one stick!)
8 ounces (about 1 1/3 cups) semisweet chocolate chips

Step 1: Begin by preheating the oven to 425 degrees F. The ingredients being used have been proven to be sticky, so make sure to line the pan with aluminum foil and non-stick spray.
Step 2: Arrange the saltines in a single layer, placing them salt-side down. As you do this, you can melt the butter and brown sugar together in a saucepan. As it comes to a boil, it will turn a caramel color. From here you will pour the mixture over the crackers.
Step 3: Bake for 3-5 minutes, or just until bubbly, but make sure that they don’t burn! After you remove the crackers from the oven, next you will pour the chocolate chips on the crackers. As they begin to soften, then you can gently smooth them over with a knife.
Step 4: Transfer the pan to the freezer. Leave them sit for 15-20 minutes, or until they become cold. The last step is to break the crackers into pieces.

This is a great time to add toppings. This recipe originated from Trisha Yearwood’s Sweet & Saltines. The secret to Country Crack is the sea salt that is grinded on top. That’s the kicker! Other good toppings could include crushed peppermint or even bacon.
If you’re at a loss for time, don’t stress! This recipe can be made in 35 minutes tops. It’s simple and delicious, and your dessert will be the talk of the night.

Enjoy!

 

Written by Lani Maddox

Non-Traditional “Pumpkin Pie” Recipe

We love this “non-traditional” Frozen Butter Pecan Pumpkin Pie recipe from www.blessedbeyondcrazy.com! Give it a try and let us know what you think!

1 quart butter pecan ice cream, softened
1 (9 inch) store purchased Oreo pie crust
1 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 cup heavy whipping cream, whipped
1/2 cup caramel ice cream topping
1/2 cup chocolate syrup
Dollop of whipped topping

Spread ice cream into the Oreo crust; freeze for 2 hours or until firm. In a small bowl, combine pumpkin, sugar, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg. Fold in whipped cream. Spread over ice cream. Cover and freeze for 2 hours or until firm. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes before slicing. Drizzle with caramel ice cream topping and chocolate syrup. Add dollop of whipped cream. (May be frozen for up to 2 months.)

Healthy Eating: Thug Kitchen Party Grub!

‘Tis the season for holiday parties! While you are planning your Thanksgiving and holiday celebrations, consider incorporating recipes from Thug Kitchen Party Grub into your menu.

Chefs Michelle Davis and Matt Holloway began blogging their healthy plant-based recipes in 2012 and released their first book last year. After teaching readers how to cook healthy and affordable dishes for themselves, they decided to release a new cookbook that would allow their fans to share their healthy eating habits with friends and family.

Thug Kitchen Party Grub contains over 100 new recipes for any occasion. Don’t let the “healthy” aspect deter you–your guests will be complimenting your culinary skills long after the party is over.
However, fair warning: it does contain strong language. Personally, we think that just adds to the charm.

Banish Lunchbox Blues with Grapes

When it comes to packing a school lunch, you know the drill: Lay out two slices of bread. Spread one with peanut butter, the other with jelly. Press together, slice diagonally and place in sandwich bag. Repeat. And repeat. And repeat.
Of course good ol’ PB&J is a lunchbox staple, but who doesn’t crave something just a little different every now and then? Here are some quick and easy ideas that are sure to earn an A-plus with your kids:

*Add halved grapes to chicken salad for a refreshing take on this timeless sandwich filling. Pack it in a separate container, and provide crackers for a crunchy alternative to bread.
*Offer a mix of baby carrots and sugar snap peas with hummus for a smashing side.
For creative sandwich substitutes, think outside the bread box:
* Create a bento-box-style, snackable lunch combo: include cheese and crackers, fresh grapes from California, and a small handful of nuts.
* Make a sandwich rollup, using flatbread or flour tortillas as the base, or stuff pita pockets with filling, as a fun replacement for sliced bread.
* Tuck whole-grain tortilla chips and salsa, a side of black bean and corn salad, plus cheese and grapes for a Mexican spin on lunch.
* Looking for a gluten-free alterative? Try a cheese stick rolled with a slice of ham, with grapes on the side.
*Shape-shift familiar lunch items to add interest: offer cheese cubes, apple rings, carrot coins, and tortilla pinwheels.
*Tuck in a cluster of fresh grapes from California for an easy finger food that’s juicy and hydrating too.

After school, a good snack can revive and refresh your student for homework time and afterschool activities. Smoothies are a great-tasting option, offering unlimited possibilities for ingredient combos and the ability to customize to everyone’s liking. Plus, they’re a nutritious way to tide over tummies until dinner, or even start the day at breakfast, by providing an excellent source of protein.
Grapes and yogurt are a classic combination, and this great-tasting smoothie proves the point: creamy and naturally sweet, simple to make and easy to embellish as desired. Just whirl all the ingredients in the blender and you’ve got a delicious superfood smoothie.

21329564Grape smoothie

1 cup lowfat vanilla yogurt
2 cups red California seedless grapes
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 banana (optional)

Place all ingredients in blender. Cover and blend until smooth. Pour and serve.

Yield: Makes 1 3/4 cups.

Note: To make a green smoothie, use green California grapes instead of red, and toss in a handful of spinach leaves.

Nutritional analysis per serving: calories 192; protein 5 g; carbohydrate 39 g; fat 1.5 g; 7 percent calories from fat; cholesterol 7.5 mg; sodium 100 mg; calcium 205 mg; fiber 1.5 g.

For more grape ideas, go to GrapesfromCalifornia.comfacebook.com/GrapesfromCalifornia,twitter.com/GrapesfromCApinterest.com/GrapesfromCA.

It’s OK to Be Bitter

Summer and cocktails go hand in hand. Whether you are relaxing at home or enjoying an evening on the town with your friends, you are doing yourself a great disservice if you are drinking classic cocktails like the Manhattan or the Old Fashioned without bitters.
We are still experimenting to determine our favorite brand, but we do have a couple that we prefer so far:

The first is Bittermilk. Founded by husband and wife team Joe and MariElena Raya, it is a line of cocktail mixers made for cocktail enthusiasts by bartenders with real ingredients. Our personal favorite is Bittermilk No. 2, Tom Collins with Elderflowers & Hops. The bright and refreshing taste feels perfect for a relaxing by the pool on a Saturday afternoon. They are crafted and bottled by human hands in Charleston, South Carolina. You can purchase them online at www.bittermilk.com.
cgjuly1
We also love Crude Bitters. Don’t be fooled by the name— it is a reference to the rudimentary origins of bitters that included exotic roots, herbs, and spices aged in various liquids with beneficial (and unverified) claims attached to them.

In truth, they are very careful to make sure their methods are not crude and that their ingredients are all natural. Their selection, preparation, maceration, bottling and labeling is done by hand in Raleigh, North Carolina. Our personal favorite selection from Crude Bitters is “Sycophant” Bitters. This flavor starts as a sweet, citrus taste and finishes with earth tones and vanilla bean. It pairs well with gin or bourbon. For more information on purchasing Crude Bitters and trying them out for yourself, visit www.crudebitters.com.

Pick up our July issue (while you still can!) for more information on the history and uses of bitters. Visit our Facebook page to win samples of a variety of bitters from the above mentioned companies! Good luck!

Common Good: From the Cover

We chose to feature peaches on our cover for the month of July— not only because they are in season, but also because there are so many delicious ways to enjoy them in the summer. Before you can choose the right peach to fit your needs, you should know a few important facts about them.

Peaches are a member of the rose family— a group that includes apricots, cherries, nectarines, plums, and almonds. They are categorized in three different varieties: clingstone, freestone, and semi-freestone.

Clingstone peaches are often found in the northern hemisphere and are most often identified as those with bright yellow flesh streaked with red as you get closer to its core. This kind is most commonly used in desserts, jellies and jams, and for canning. They are the most flavorful of the three varieties.

Though flavorful, clingstone peaches can become difficult on the go. Freestone peaches are more convenient for carrying in lunch boxes or for mid-morning snacks. Though this variety is firmer and less juicy, they’re still delicious. They are also much easier to find in a grocery store.

Semi-freestone peaches are a combination of the two and can be used in many different dishes.

For a great summer recipe using peaches, visit Everyday Occasions.

 

Written by Lani Maddox