Tag Archives: recipes

Bella Eats

Southern from Scratch

Introducing a new book featuring Southern essentials & downhome recipes.

A holistic nutritionist and homesteader, Ashley English was raised in the hills of Southern Appalachia with a strong legacy of female cooks crafting memorable meals. Southern from Scratch combines the foods she grew up eating and the information she learned while pursuing her nutrition degree. The 150 recipes inside all honor the classics of the southern kitchen, but with an emphasis on local, seasonal produce and slow scratch cooking. Ashley shows you how to build your own Southern pantry with 50 key essentials from pickles and relishes to jams and spreads, sauces and vinegars, and more. From there, she shares 100 dishes that incorporate those base recipes. Create your own down-home Southern kitchen with recipes ranging from grits and buttermilk biscuits to BBQ sauce and pickled deviled eggs. Visit her blog at www.smallmeasure.com

Earth Girl Wellness – What’s a GMO?

What’s a GMO?

Written by Tina Hatcher, Earth Girl Wellness

Food manufacturers praise their products as Non-GMO. A television commercial portrays Triscuits as “Nongenemodiscuit.” So what’s with the Non-GMO trend? Is it worth our interest since most food marketing departments have long tried to lure us in with fancy wording to entice us to buy their product? Especially since many of these marketing ploys are only vain attempts to make a product inaccurately sound healthier? Earth Girl thinks the Non-GMO marketing trend is worth the added effort.

GMOs are “Genetically Modified Organisms.” Essentially natural food items (fruits and vegetables) have their genetic material altered to create a newer, “healthier” version of the food. Take corn for example. One species of corn has a piece of its genetic material taken and inserted into another species of corn to make it more resistant to drought, torrential rain, bugs, or undernourished soil. The new version of corn is then easier to grow in harsh conditions, creating higher crop production and lowering cost. Sounds great, doesn’t it? Cross-breeding of crops has been done for centuries to create similar results. So what’s so bad about that? Cross-breeding is a naturally occurring event. A farmer can put two similar breeds of corn together to make a new breed. Genetically modifying the corn is a scientific process occurring in a laboratory; two unrelated species are forced to combine. Think of it like this: You can create a new breed of dog by allowing natural puppy love to occur or you can create a “Frankenpup” by taking an eye from one and a leg from another.

As a point of debate, most of these new species are created to help bolster food supplies in challenging environments. Unfortunately, food executives have also used the technology to make a maximum amount of profit from their products. Most of the products containing GMO ingredients are of such poor quality, we shouldn’t eat them. But let’s push the point a little bit. What other ramifications can come from GMO products? Not a single GMO product can be labeled as organic and can’t really attest to the health of the nutrition or the potential harshness of the product to the land. There is not a single long term study which can validate the safety of these products. GMOs may not have dramatic effects on the current generation but can side effects show up in our children or our children’s children? Additionally, GMOs can ultimately eradicate normally occurring species of many fruits or vegetables. Cross pollination can occur across GMO farm and organic farms that are literally miles apart.

So how can you know if your food is safely free from GMOs? The most commonly genetically modified crops today are corn and soy. These are found in virtually every packaged product on the supermarket shelf! Earth Girl highly recommends putting any GMO product back on the shelf. Look for the Non-GMO Verified Green Seal of Approval and buy organic when possible. For more information on GMOs, go to The Non-GMO Project at www.nongmoproject.org.

For more info about Earth Girl Wellness, visit here.

Simple Sheet Pan Suppers

At times, spending hours in the kitchen can be a relaxing, enjoyable experience. However, even for avid home cooks, a busy weeknight isn’t one of those times. Fortunately, solutions like sheet pan suppers make it easy to create dishes with exceptional flavor depth that come together quickly and clean up just as fast.

Keeping a variety of vegetables on hand makes it simple to pull together a family meal. Onions, for example, are versatile, flavorful, easy to store, have a long shelf-life and are available year-round from U.S. growers. An added benefit when cooking with onions is that you’re serving up a good source of fiber.

For more tasty recipes to make supper a cinch, visit onions-usa.org and usaonions.com.

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Spicy Sheet Pan Roasted Jambalaya

Recipe courtesy of the National Onion Association and Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee

Servings: 4-6

1          large yellow onion, diced
1/2       large green bell pepper, diced
1/2       large yellow bell pepper, diced
1/2       large red bell pepper, diced
3          stalks celery, sliced or diced
2          garlic cloves, minced
1-2       jalapeños, seeded and diced
1          pint cherry tomatoes
3          tablespoons olive oil, divided
1/2       teaspoon salt
1/2       teaspoon black pepper
1          link (13.5 ounces) Andouille sausage, sliced
1          pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined
1          tablespoon Cajun seasoning blend
linguine noodles, cooked according to package directions
1-2       lemons, sliced in thin wedges
2          green onions, sliced
fresh chopped parsley

Heat oven to 400 F.
Line 13-by-18-inch sheet pan with parchment paper.
In large bowl, combine onion, bell peppers, celery, garlic, jalapeños, tomatoes, 2 tablespoons olive oil, salt and pepper until evenly combined. Spread out evenly on pan in single layer. Add slices of Andouille sausage. Roast 15-20 minutes, or until vegetables are tender and start to brown.
Toss shrimp with Cajun seasoning and prepare linguine noodles.
When ready, remove baking sheet from oven. Place shrimp on top of vegetable and sausage mixture in single layer. Top with half the lemon wedges. Return to oven and cook about 5-8 minutes, or until shrimp is no longer pink.
Serve over linguine garnished with green onions and parsley with remaining fresh lemon wedges on side.

 

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Easy Drumstick-Quinoa Sheet Pan Supper

Recipe courtesy of the National Onion Association and Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee

Servings: 4-6

8-10     chicken legs
1          fennel bulb
1          large yellow onion, sliced
1          large red onion, sliced
2          garlic cloves, sliced
3          medium-sized potatoes, cubed
1          orange (1/4 cup juice and zest)
1/4       teaspoon thyme, dried
2          tablespoons olive oil
1          teaspoon sea salt
1/2       teaspoon black pepper
2          tablespoons fresh chopped parsley
orange rind curls
brown rice, cooked according to package directions
quinoa, cooked according to package directions

Heat oven to 400 F.
Line 13-by-18-inch sheet pan with parchment paper.
Place chicken legs on pan. Spread fennel, yellow onion, red onion, garlic and potatoes around and in between legs.
In small bowl, whisk together orange juice and zest, thyme and olive oil. Pour mixture over chicken and vegetables. Season with salt and pepper.
Roast 45 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through and vegetables are tender. Cook rice and quinoa.
Garnish chicken with parsley and orange curls. Serve over brown rice and quinoa.

 

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Sheet Pan-Style Buddha Bowls

Recipe courtesy of the National Onion Association and Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee

Servings: 4-6

2          yellow onions, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch wedges
1/2       head of red or purple cabbage, cut into wedges
2          red potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch wedges
1          small butternut squash, peeled and 1/2-inch diced
1          pound Brussels sprouts, halved
extra-virgin olive oil
salt, to taste
black pepper, to taste
1 1/2    cups quinoa, cooked according to package directions

Tahini sauce:

1          tablespoon tahini
1/2       lemon, juiced
1          teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/2-1    teaspoon maple syrup
2          avocados, peeled and sliced
fresh parsley

 

Heat oven to 400 F.
Line 13-by-18-inch sheet pan with parchment paper.
Place onion, cabbage, potatoes, squash and Brussels sprouts in single layer on pan. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast vegetables 40 minutes, or until tender. Add more salt and pepper if needed.

While vegetables roast, cook quinoa.
To make tahini sauce: In small bowl, whisk tahini, lemon juice, mustard and syrup until smooth.
To assemble Buddha bowls: Spoon quinoa into bowls. Add roasted veggies and garnish with avocado and parsley. Drizzle tahini sauce over each bowl and serve.

 

All About Onions

Knowing how to buy and store onions can make them true superstars in your kitchen. Growers and shippers of the National Onion Association and Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee offer these tips:

Buying
When shopping, buy onions with dry outer skins, free of spots or blemishes. The onion should be firm and have no scent. Avoid bulbs that have begun to sprout.

Yellow, red and white onions are available year-round from producers in the United States.

Seasonal differences like flavor and texture are noticeable and highlighted during these time frames:

Fall and winter onions (available August-April ) have multiple layers of thick, paper-like layers of skin. Known for their mild to pungent flavor profile, these varieties can be eaten raw, and are ideal for roasting, caramelizing, grilling and frying because they have less water content.

Spring and summer onions (available March-August) have thin, often transparent skins and are typically sweeter and milder than fall and winter varieties. Due to their high water content and mild flavor, they are best used for raw, pickled, lightly cooked or grilled dishes.

 

Storing
Store onions in a cool, dry, well-ventilated place, not the refrigerator. Do not store whole, unpeeled onions in plastic bags. Lack of air movement reduces storage life. Peeled or cut onions may be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

Source: National Onion Association and Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee

 

Bella Sips: Sloshies

The temperatures are climbing, and we find ourselves longing for a nice cold drink under an umbrella by the water. If it’s your day to relax, or you’d like to try a new drink by the lake with your friends, Sloshies: 102 Boozy Cocktails Straight from the Freezer has you covered! With everything from tart drinks like Whiskey Smashed, to spiced drinks like High on the Hog, your experience is destined to be unforgettable!

Whiskey Smashed
Give your party an extra kick with this smashing combination of small-batch Kentucky bourbon on top of a citrus blend and minty frozen love.

ABV: 9.77%
Glass: Up & Down
Garnish: mint leaf, lemon wheel, and a floppy hat (for you to wear)

2 3/4 ounces water
9 ounces Simple Syrup
7 1/4 ounces Mint Simple Syrup
6 ounces lemon juice
6 3/4 ounces lime juice
8 3/4 ounces Woodford Reserve Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Combine
Place the ingredients in a medium-size metal bowl and stir.

Freeze
Pour the liquid into a large freezer bag and place it in the freezer until frozen, approximately 4 hours. Alternatively, pour the liquid into an ice cream maker and proceed per the manufacturer’s instructions.

Serve
When you’re ready to drink, massage the freezer bag by hand until it’s a wet, slushy consistency. If it’s not breaking up, run the bag quickly under hot water and massage some more.

High on the Hog
Bacon is the candy of meats. It’s so delicious, we decided just to build a drink around it. Ginger, maple, and bourbon roll on your tongue while you fight the urge to just eat the bacon garnish first.

ABV: 12.78%
Glass: Up & Down
Garnish: strip of crispy bacon

27 ounces ginger ale
2 ounces Dolin Dry Vermouth de Chambéry
2  3/4 ounces Cabin Fever Maple Flavored Whisky
8  1/4 ounces Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Combine
Place the ingredients in a medium-size metal bowl and stir.

Freeze
Pour the liquid into a large freezer bag and place it in the freezer until frozen, approximately 4 hours. Alternatively, pour the liquid into an ice cream maker and proceed per the manufacturer’s instructions.

Serve
When you’re ready to drink, massage the freezer bag by hand until it’s a wet, slushy consistency. If it’s not breaking up, run the bag quickly under hot water and massage some more.

Makes at least 4 drinks.

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