Tag Archives: southwest virginia

Meet Cinda Malouin

cindaCinda Malouin craves adventure. She carries the message of healthy living and sustainable agriculture to children and families in the city, making sure to incorporate an education component (the “Power of Produce”) and cultural activities (such as pet adoption days and a cookbook swap) each week. At home, she raises Dwarf Nigerian Goats, chickens (Silkies, Barred Rocks, Red Stars, and Americanas), guinea hens and cocks, including five recently-born baby keets. 

Nominated by Jenny Carter

Join us each weekday during the month of October as we recognize extraordinary women in our area! Nominate someone you know by emailing us: bella@beckmediagroup.com.

 

Reduce Tailgating Waste

tailgating

Tailgating at your favorite sports events is almost as big a draw as the game itself, with lots of food, lots of fun – and, unfortunately, lots of waste. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, large college stadiums can generate 100 tons of waste per game. But you can help reduce game day waste by taking a few simple steps, such as choosing the right packaging, recycling everything you can, and using tailgating essentials made with recycled plastics.

Here are some tips for minimizing waste at your next tailgate:

* Airtight: Choose airtight plastic packaging, such as zipper bags, factory-sealed pouches, cling wrap, and reusable storage containers to help keep food fresh and free of contaminants that could cause spoilage. This can help reduce the likelihood that food will need to be thrown out.

* Minimalist: Recent innovations are leading to new, minimalist packaging designs that help protect food with less material, helping reduce packaging waste. Look for thin, lightweight pouches and bags for game day foods, such as nuts, cheeses, and deli meats, just to name a few.

* Lightweight: Look for beverages sold in lightweight plastic bottles and containers – they’re shatter-resistant which contributes to safety, they typically use less material than alternatives (resulting in less packaging waste), and they’re accepted for recycling in most communities.

* Recycling: Place clearly labeled bags or bins at your tailgate to remind everyone to recycle used plastic packaging and other recyclables. More and more everyday plastic bottles and containers can be recycled in curbside programs, including beverage bottles, ketchup and mustard bottles, containers for sour cream and dip, deli containers, caps and lids, and more. Even plastic bags and wraps – grocery bags, zipper bags, bread and bun bags, wraps for cases of water and soft drinks – can be returned to participating grocery and retail stores for recycling. Check your community’s website or visit www.iwanttoberecycled.org or www.Earth911.com to find out how to recycle as much as possible in your community.

* Recycled: Finally, seek out products made with recycled plastics. Thanks to increased plastics recycling, it’s never been easier to find tailgating essentials made with recycled plastics, such as coolers, serving utensils, plates, cups and bowls.

Meet Cindy Doyle

cindydoyleCindy Doyle has built a successful career as an artist and entrepreneur.  With a longstanding commitment to her community and a passion for revitalizing the downtown area, her restaurant “Stella, Bella and Lucy’s” has been both an idea and a dream. 

Nominated by Jenny Carter

Join us each weekday during the month of October as we recognize extraordinary women in our area! Nominate someone you know by emailing us: bella@beckmediagroup.com.

Snacking with Sara

bellawebsarasnackEnjoy your snack time with an all-natural gourmet cookie safe for you and your whole family! Sara Snacker, a milk and cookies company, has just the natural and satisfying treat for you.

The business began as the desire of Sara, a mother of three, to give her kids wholesome but yummy snacks. Sara Snacker Cookie Company bakes with only the freshest, finest and all natural ingredients.

The cookies never contain artificial flavors, colors, additives, or preservatives and are now peanut-free. All of Sara’s products are also certified Kosher and will retain their freshness in the original bag for two months. However, it is recommended that you store the remainder of the cookies in a sealed container once the bag is opened to keep them fresh and crisp.

Sara’s cookies are available in a variety of flavors including vanilla milkshake, lemonade, s’more, ice cream cone and hot chocolate. Also, for those who want to satisfy their sweet and salty cravings simultaneoulsy, there are two flavors made with potato chips and pretzel bits!

Locally, you can find these yummy treats at Kroger. If you cannot find them in a store near you, or you simply want more information, check out the store locator on their website.

 

Written by Kristi Hall 

Meet Timika Terry-Cabbler

timikaTimika Terry-Cabbler is associate evangelist of New Life Christian Fellowship. She recently received her Master of Arts in Religion/Biblical Studies from Liberty University.  She’s a television producer and the publisher of the forthcoming www.urbanroanoke.com, as well as employed by Allstate.

When the local League of Older Americans lost funding to give air conditioners to the elderly, she immediately spearheaded a drive to help. What truly describes her heart, is my mother fell ill three days after we were married and she helped me care for her until her recent passing. She has NEVER sought attention, which makes this the perfect opportunity for me to inform the community of her contributions. 

Nominated by Scott Terry-Cabbler

Join us each weekday during the month of October as we recognize extraordinary women in our area! Nominate someone you know by emailing us: bella@beckmediagroup.com.

Meet Macel Janoshka

macelMacel Janoschka has a passion for women’s leadership and community service. She is immediate past president of the Junior League of Roanoke Valley.  During her tenure, The Junior League awarded $100,000 in grants and scholarships to deserving community projects that benefited childhood health and welfare.
She just completed a four year term on the VA State Bar Young Lawyers Conference’s Board of Governors where her focus was on programs promoting diversity in the legal field.
Macel currently serves on the Roanoke Bar Association Board of Directors. She volunteers twice a month at a city school, teaches Sunday School and serves as a youth leader at her church.
Macel does all of this and more while being the mom to a 2 year old and 4 year old and a partner at Frith, Anderson and Peake.

Nominated by Mary Beverly

Join us each weekday during the month of October as we recognize extraordinary women in our area! Nominate someone you know by emailing us: bella@beckmediagroup.com.

Make Pure Ingredients Part of Daily Life

pureingredientsTrends and fad diets come and go. But a progressive approach to nutrition – one grounded in positive eating – remains constant. It’s the desire to get more out of food with real, pure ingredients. Most people find the commitment to natural, healthy living isn’t as challenging as they imagined.

From the garden to the market, and the kitchen to the table, countless opportunities allow you to incorporate plant-based, nutrient-rich foods into your diet:

* Make the most of the grocery store. Eating real, pure foods, including whole grains, is at the core of a healthy lifestyle. Take a closer look at packaging to find items made with wholesome ingredients. You’ll be excited to see that many grocery stores carry a variety of nutritious options.

“People don’t always look as closely as they should,” says dietitian Toby Amidor. “Dig in and read the labels to get the full picture and educate yourself on the foods in your grocery basket.”

* Get into gardening. There’s no need to till your yard and plant rows of crops – gardening can start small, in a pot or container. Herbs, lettuce, spinach and tomatoes are all great porch and patio plants. If you’re feeling a little more ambitious, try a raised-bed garden with a variety of plants, from cabbage to cucumbers and beyond.

“Growing your own garden can do more than provide tasty produce. It can also be a therapeutic way to increase your overall intake of vegetables,” says Amidor. “When I was growing up, my dad had an amazing garden. He taught me how to plant, weed and pick produce like radishes, carrots, sunflower seeds, cucumbers and tomatoes. Gardening is a great way to bond with family members and educate the next generation about the importance of farm-to-table.”

* Keep it up in the kitchen. It’s important to make sure you’re getting all the right nutrients to fuel your day. Are your foods providing essential vitamins, minerals and protein?

“Meeting the Daily Value of around 50 grams of protein for the average adult can be challenging – especially for vegans and vegetarians. Protein is an essential component of a nutritious diet,” says Amidor. “To incorporate more plant-based proteins into your meals, exercise your imagination and pair together different types of proteins, like whole grains, legumes and nuts to create wholesome meals.”

The more you learn about real, pure ingredients, the more delicious ways you’ll find to enjoy them.

Meet Mariah Clark

mariahMariah Amine Clark, a graduate of the Apparel Department at Virginia Tech is a designer extraordinaire. She founded Mariah Amine Couture in 2007 and three years later opened a retail boutique that offers classes and instruction for budding knitters and seamstresses. 

Nominated by Jenny Carter

Join us each weekday during the month of October as we recognize extraordinary women in our area! Nominate someone you know by emailing us: bella@beckmediagroup.com.