Tag Archives: Virginia

The Spa & Adventure Center at Hotel Roanoke

The Spa & Adventure Center is now open on the main level of Hotel Roanoke! Virginia’s Blue Ridge is known worldwide for its culture, scenic beauty and outdoor recreation. Now you can combine it all for one fabulous experience! 

The Spa invites you to escape to a place of calm, serenity and well-being. You can experience services like an ancient minerals foot soak and massage at Salt Foot Sanctuary (open to hotel guests and the public!) and therapeutic massages (only available to hotel guests). Both are healing and relaxing experiences. 

Salt Foot Sanctuary is a shared experience centered around luxurious handmade foot soaks. You’ll select nourishing ingredients and then sit back and relax in plush chairs outfitted with comfy pillows and a warm neck wrap. (Choose additional pampering by adding one the massages during the soak.) Soaks are made with natural ancient minerals combined with essential oils and other nourishing ingredients, including Blue Ridge Mountain salt. 

Finally, the Adventure Center can complete your experience by allowing you to explore and discover the Roanoke Valley and Virginia’s Blue Ridge region by offering several food and cultural tours, as well as their fun brewery tours and outdoor recreation tours to attractions all over the region. The Adventure Center can help you plan and book the perfect outing or activity for you and your entire group. 

www.sparoanokeva.com 

Treat Varicose Veins This Winter to Ensure Vacation Bliss Next Summer

Article courtesy of Jefferson Surgical Clinic

Frigid winter temperatures promote office daydreams featuring temperate vacation getaways and cocktails at sunset. Although you’re more consumed this time of year with clearing snow-covered sidewalks than strolling white sandy beaches, those bungalow dreams will be a reality before you know it and if you are one of many suffering with spider and varicose veins, now is the optimal time to prepare for swimsuit season. 

Wintertime may just be the right time to consider summertime. Before you are ready to show off your legs on the beach, consider getting those aging veins treated and made more beautiful for the oncoming summer. Allow yourself plenty of time for treatment of your spider veins. 

Varicose veins are enlarged, visible, and sometimes uncomfortable veins typically found in the legs and feet. Varicose veins show noticeable enlargement due to the pressure caused by increased blood flow and prolonged standing and sitting postures. And while you are probably thinking about parkas and not swimsuits this time of year, winter is the ideal season to consider relief from varicose veins. 

Thomas D. Conlee, M.D.

Thomas D. Conlee, M.D., of Jefferson Surgical Clinic is one of the region’s recognized vascular and general surgeons, as well as a local leader on the identification and treatment of varicose veins. “For many of the patients I’ve treated, varicose veins are cosmetic concerns that keep them from showing their legs in public,” said Dr. Conlee. 

Although it is common for patients to address varicose veins later in life, damaged veins can also be controlled and treated at a younger age before they are permitted to develop into a more aggravated situation. Additionally, circumstances that encourage the development of varicose veins include transitional life moments common with younger women, including pregnancy. 

“I find that younger patients put off treating the issue. But with today’s advanced technology, the solution is simple, fast, and effective. There is really no reason to live with spider and varicose veins,” remarked Dr. Conlee. “The relief that our minimally invasive endovenous laser ablation procedure delivers is quick. Patients appreciate the simplicity of the procedure and their speedy recovery.” 

Jefferson Surgical Clinic physicians use the Dornier Laser. The technology is safe and highly effective. Utilizing short, high-energy pulses, the laser quickly seals the vein with minimal discomfort. It’s very gentle to skin and safe for all skin types, including darker skin. 

“I know people hear ‘laser’ and become anxious; however, the technology allows us to perform these complex procedures with only local anesthesia, like Novocaine, and virtually no post-operative recovery time. Endovenous laser ablation greatly reduces swelling, heaviness, and alleviates pain or discomfort you may be experiencing from varicose veins,” said Dr. Conlee. 

The benefits of treating varicose veins, no matter your age, range from physical relief from pain to improved self-esteem. Don’t wait. Treatment is simple, minimally invasive, and best completed in the winter months to allow the proper amount of healing before you swap the winter closet with your spring-summer wardrobe. 

Since opening in 1956, Jefferson Surgical Clinic continues to grow and implement leading-edge technology in every area of practice. We strive to serve the Roanoke Valley by providing accomplished physicians who provide personalized medicine and innovative treatment options by staff that is committed to providing exceptional service. www.jeffersonsurgical.com 

Top Three Hikes Within an Hour of Lynchburg

By Rachel Van Tuyl

As summer draws to a close and November ushers in cooler temperatures, Lynchburg residents and students may find themselves looking for some beautiful hikes in the area. With so many natural areas around the city, it isn’t difficult to find hikes to fit any level of difficulty.

Husband and wife team Adam and Christine Anderson, who run the website Virginia Trail Guide, have grown up hiking Virginia trails, and offer advice to hikers who may not be very familiar with the area.

Sharp Top Mountain

Thirty-four miles to the west of Liberty University’s campus lies Sharp Top Mountain, which is visible from Liberty’s campus. The 2.6 mile hike is a steep uphill all the way to the top, so this trail will definitely give hikers a workout. A series of steps forms most of the trail, for a total of a 1,227-foot elevation gain.

Despite the trail’s difficulties, it still seems to be a popular destination among hikers.

“The trail is a little rocky and there are some stiffer uphill sections, but it is well worth the effort,” reviewer Dave Phillips wrote.

Adam Anderson has been hiking Sharp Top since childhood, and he has noticed more people taking the hike over the years.

“I always recommend (starting) a hike up Sharp Top early in the morning, so you can take in the beautiful view with a bit of solitude,” Adam Anderson said.

Crabtree Falls

Located just 45 miles from Liberty, Crabtree Falls is the tallest waterfall east of the Mississippi River. It is a moderate hike with few challenges.

“Crabtree Falls is probably one of the easiest waterfall hikes in the Mid-Atlantic,” reviewer Melissa Moore wrote. “The waterfall is only a few hundred feet from the parking lot via a flat, paved path, (and) the viewpoint for the falls is right there next to the falls.”

However, Christine Anderson said that more experienced hikers who want a challenge can continue hiking beyond Crabtree Falls to either Spy Rock or The Priest.

“Both of those spots offer amazing views and are challenging add-ons to the Crabtree Falls Hike,” Christine Anderson said.

Although the falls are a beautiful location, they are not without their dangers.

“It also has the misfortune of being one of the deadliest spots in (George Washington National Forest),” Christine Anderson said. “The rocks are very slippery, but hikers keep leaving the trail and climbing out toward the waterfall.”

According to a sign at the falls, the rocks are slippery because of clear algae growing on them. But Christine Anderson said the hike is safe if hikers stay on the marked trails.

McAfee Knob

Perhaps one of the most well-known trails is the McAfee Knob hike, located about an hour from Liberty. The 8.8 mile hike, with its picturesque views, offers visitors unique photo opportunities. Thousands of hikers visit the area every year to have their picture taken atop the knob jutting out from the mountain.

For many, McAfee Knob holds special memories.

“I spent my birthday backpacking across McAfee Knob a couple years ago,” Christine Anderson said. “I got to sit on the ledge and dangle my feet over the view. It’s a gift to have a birthday in such a glorious spot.”

Since the Appalachian Trail crosses McAfee Knob, the area sees many visitors, and it is the most photographed area on the entire Appalachian Trail, according to Christine Anderson. She believes that the hardest part of the hike isn’t the trail itself, but rather trying to find a parking spot.

“With the rise of Instagram and other social media, casual hikers are choosing to visit this iconic spot in increasing numbers,” Christine Anderson said. “It can be hard to find parking, and the trail is often quite crowded.”

Hikers who want to try McAfee Knob can visit Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club’s website, which offers tips and other information on this hike.

“We’re lucky to be in a state that has so many wonderful hiking trails,” Christine Anderson said. “No matter what trail you choose, you’re going to see something great.”

Whether hikers choose to scale a mountain or visit waterfalls, it is important to plan ahead for hikes. This includes checking the weather, and having a trail map, first aid kit, water and snacks. Hikers can also look for a list of 10 essentials for all hikers.

“Looking at some of the sights you see on these three hikes will naturally cause you to pause and reflect on the beauty of nature,” Adam Anderson said. “With the crazy world that surrounds us on a daily basis, we could all use some of that to help ground us and think about our place in this world.”

Profile: Peacock Soap Company

Beyond the Gift

The unique origins of locally-owned Peacock Soap Company

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

To celebrate her 10-year anniversary, Kristie Paxton and her husband spent a week driving along the west coast. One night, they found themselves at a cute, very hospitable, Bed and Breakfast in Oregon. The owners had one room left to offer the Southwest Virginia couple, and it had a bathtub, but no shower.

“They felt so guilty about it that they stocked the room with soaps and lotions,” Kristie recalls. “They didn’t really sell them, but they allowed me to purchase some. I brought them home, used them up, and requested more.”

Soon after, Kristie decided to start making her own soaps for personal use. With a little help from the Bed and Breakfast owners and a few books, she quickly found that her new hobby yielded enough product to sell to the community as well. She opened Peacock Soap Company, lovingly named for her grandmother’s affinity for raising peacocks. For the past eight years, she has made and sold soaps, lotions, and other toiletries at local stores and the Grandin Farmers Market. Recently, she expanded her line to include beeswax and soap nuts.

“[Soap nuts] are literally a nut grown on a tree,” Kristie explains. “The nuts are grown in India. I buy them and package them. They are a really interesting alternative to laundry detergent.” Kristie has started using soap nuts in her home as well. “They are completely reusable,” she adds. “You can throw them in the washing machine five or six times and then compost them.”

Peacock Soap Company stands out from the competition with unique scent offerings. Their beer and wine soaps actually contain beer and wine, and the sugar content makes each soap extra sudsy. (This would be a great stocking stuffer for the wine or beer lover in your life!) Additional scents for the winter season will include Crackling Firewood, Ginger Snap, Evergreen, and the signa-ture Peacock Bar.

Kristie also makes hand and body lotions, lightweight face lotions, lip balm, and liquid soaps. You can find her, on occasion, as a fill-in vendor at the Grandin Farmers Market. Her products are
also sold at Downshift and the Treehouse Collaborative. Additionally, Kristie will participate in the KrisKindle Market at the Clifton Forge School of the Arts this month! Stay updated on Peacock Soap Company and purchase directly from a link to their Etsy page by following them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/peacocksoapco. Finally, if you see Kristie at the Grandin Farmers Market, be on the lookout for a special touch on her table!

Another nod to her grandmother, Kristie displays her packaged soaps on her grandmother’s china. “It’s kind of sweet because I get that question a lot about where my name came from,”she says. “It’s nice to be able to tote her along.”

Hayleigh is a freelance writer, independent author, and writing consultant. In 2017, she published her first novel, The Huntsman: A modern retelling of Red Riding Hood. She spends a lot of time traveling and exploring new regions for inspiration, but Roanoke will always be her home. www.hayleighworgan.com.

Virginia Made: RIOT Rooster

Holiday Shopping

Support local artisans and small businesses while celebrating RIOT Rooster’s 10th Anniversary!

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

To say we are excited about RIOT Rooster is an under-statement! This month, RIOT Rooster will celebrate its 10th year, and will host their two-day event at 16 West Marketplace. Come on out to shop small, relax, and celebrate with your favorite Bella girls on Friday, November 16 from 5-10pm and Saturday, November 17 from 9am-6pm!

As returning fans of this event already know, there are many reasons to love and support RIOT Rooster. In addition to the importance of supporting local, small businesses, RIOT Rooster is a place that puts the fun back in holiday shopping. Unlike other shopping events in the area, it is open to the public with no admis-sion fee! Community is the main focus here, and you’ll find that in the details. Always family-friendly, special features include a fire-pit lounge and the Cactus Joe Choo Choo, which will offer free down-town rides to attendees.

Several artists participating this year are making limited edition items to commemorate the 10th anniversary of this special event. First up, one of our personal favorites: Piper Lane, of Magpiper Metalworks (www.facebook.com/magpipermetalworks), is creating a “ring for the resistance”. She will offer ten of these limited edition, adjustable rings, exclusively for RIOT Rooster.

Next, Giant Star (www.facebook.com/giantstarco), a collaboration between Josh Gibson of Giant Step Design and Stratton Delany from Starlight Bicycles, will offer a limited edition RIOT Rooster tee available only at this year’s event. They will also sell their popular stock designs of regional natural assets such as McAffee Knob and The Cove.

Finally, Robin Gross and Andy Dillon of Transcendent Glass (www.facebook.com/TranscendentGlass), a knitting and glass-making business, will create their own limited edition collaborative piece for RIOT Rooster. Keep an eye out on social media for more details as they are available!

With what we know about RIOT Rooster, 16 West Marketplace will be filled with talented artisans, and there will be something special for everyone! This is the place to find handmade, upcycled, recycled, and odd and useful gifts for all of the people who are hard to shop for on your holiday lists. Set aside time to browse and enjoy the environment—you won’t even have to leave for food and beverages!

Existing businesses will be open inside 16 West Market-place, including Little Green Hive and Wok n Roll Kitchen. The Roanoke City Democratic Committee will also serve craft libations on both days, with all proceeds benefitting the West End Center.

This event is eagerly anticipated by those who attend every November, so don’t miss your opportunity to get there on Friday night and take advantage of swag while you shop for the limited-edition items throughout 16 West Marketplace! Stay tuned to RIOT Rooster’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/RIOTRooster) for vendor updates, giveaways, and more!

 

Hayleigh is a freelance writer, independent author, and writing consultant. In 2017, she published her first novel, The Huntsman: A modern retelling of Red Riding Hood. She spends a lot of time traveling and exploring new regions for inspiration, but Roanoke will always be her home. www.hayleighworgan.com.

Virginia Made

Meet April Chavez of 704 North Design Co. 

The holiday season is upon us. The hustle and bustle of November is welcome as plans are made for Thanksgiving and Christmas. The last two months of the year are here with promises of warm gatherings with family and friends, food and laughter. There’s a mood of festivity in theair as plans are made and gift shopping begins. Makers like April Chavez, owner and artist of 704 North Design Co finds herself especially busy during this time. Her painted signs of Blue Ridge inspired mountains and inspirational sayings are in high demand during theseason. 

As a stay-at-home mom, art is an outlet for April. Born and raised in Iowa, when she moved to Lynchburg 15 years ago for college, her family came right along with her. Now married with two children, family remains at the top of her priority list. While her children are at school, the ins and outs of 704 North keeps this maker busy. Beginning the business with more than just wood signs, April has now found her niche and business is booming. 

Lynchburg is known for having a strong community who support local business owners and makers. That support along with a growing social media following and requests for herproducts in local stores and boutiques set April on the path to owning her own business. Realizing the demand for her work, she soon found herself with an Etsy shop and setting up at local markets. The recurring theme of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains is one of 704 North’s most popular designs. April’s inspirational signs also stand out as a declaration of her faith and personal motto to live a life worthy of the gospel ofChrist. 

April prides herself in the work that goes into each piece. From start to finish the designs are cut, sanded and painted by the maker. Other aspects of the business such as photographs and social media are all a part of her hard work. Local shows sometime become a family affair as her children and husband tag along to help set-up or simply just to bring meals or support. Much of the business was learned by trial and error. Fortunately, her parents who run a small business as well as her husband who also has a business provide sounding boards for ideas. 

Running the business is not all fun and games but what makes it worthwhile is the joy of customers as they fall in love with a piece and joyfully take it to its new home. 

All work and no play makes a dull day but even while painting April finds entertainment listening to conspiracy theory podcasts. Binge watching CW shows or Netflix is usually on the agenda with her husband on off days. Surprisingly enough, April is an avid sports fan and dreams of a vacation that includes going to the Masters. You can find her with her children taking trips to the skatepark with her son or taking her daughter to dance. Spending time with family is a priority most days because, as rewarding as 704 North Designs is, family is the greatest reward of all. 

For more details, find 704 North Design Co on Facebook and Instagram.

Written by Faith Jones

Faith Jones is a local entrepreneur, creative, and believer. Her businesses include Faith Inspired and The Hill City Handmade. Faith has a degree in Art and Photography and is a former high school art and culinary teacher. She enjoys spending time with her family and travelling. www.thehillcityhandmade.com 

Young Female Writers Club

Lifting Girls Up Through Sports Literature

Meet 16-year-old author Paige Brotherton  Written by K.L. Kranes

When it comes to girls and sports, the times have changed. In 1972, after the landmark Title IX legislation passed, only one in 27 girls participated in high school sports. Over 45 years later, that number has increased to two in five. Although the playing field is still not equal, women have 1.3 million fewer high school and over 60,000 fewer college sports participation opportunities than men, more girls than ever actively participate in sports.

But as often happens, particularly with stories for children and young adults, literature has not kept up with the times. 

“There are girls who like to slide in the mud and get dirty, but there are not a lot of books for girls who like to do these sports,” says 16-year-old Paige Brotherton of Williamsburg, Virginia, author of Avery Appreciates True Friendship, the fourth installment of the Lady Tigers book series. 

The series, started by her mother Dawn Brotherton, adds a relatable representation of girls in sports to the middle grade literature genre, expanding beyond the overarching subject to explore how athletics can shape a girl’s internal and external world. 

“I find it important to represent female athletes because there aren’t as many out there,” says Paige, who I speak with while she waits for rowing practice to begin. “The best way to prove girls are physically strong and capable is to fill the world with such women.”

Sports played a large role in Paige’s life from a young age. In elementary school during free time, she chose participating in races over chatting with friends. Both the competition and the team camaraderie of sports appeal to Paige.

“I’ve learned the benefits of being on a team. I’m not just working hard because I want to win. I’m working hard because I want my teammates in the boat next to me to win as well,” Paige says.

Her passion for writing, however, bloomed later than her passion for sports. In 7th grade, while writing a story based on her experiences at school, she discovered her love for creating characters and bringing them through conflicts. Having been an avid reader her whole life, Paige immediately understood the importance of making characters authentic, no matter the setting.  

“My favorite part of stories are the characters. It’s even more powerful when the characters are relatable and speak to the readership on some level. The nuances of human nature are universal, whether they’re found at Tatooine, in Middle Earth or on a softball field,” she says.

Therefore, when it came time to develop the next book in the Lady Tigers series, Paige had an idea. Having already tackled themes such as honesty, military deployment and sportsmanship, Paige felt the series should explore a more introspective topic for young girls—positive self-image. Concerned whether an adult writer could accurately depict the struggles girls face today in the tangled web of social media, Paige suggested she write the book and the publisher agreed. 

“Self-image has been transformed rapidly to such an extent it’s a subject that needs young authors to tell other young readers they’re perfect and here’s why,” Paige explains. 

Using sports as a springboard for a deeper discussion of self-perception and stereotypes, the book focuses on how girls compare themselves to their friends and often feel they come up lacking. 

“As social media, general picture posting, and makeup reach ever-younger audiences, girls begin to compare themselves to the girls around them,” says Paige. “I want to explain how every girl has something special about themselves that the rest of the world wishes they had.”

Paige felt the backdrop of sports provided the perfect avenue to explore this topic. She witnessed first-hand girls lose interest in sports or become demotivated as the athletic gap between girls and boys widened, thus further affecting self-image.

“When I was in elementary school, a girl could match a guy in running and lifting. Now in high school, no matter how much I train will never be as fast as the guys,” she explains. “After elementary school, it only gets harder and makes girls feel inferior.” 

Paige believes demonstrating how sports encompass more than just athleticism is critical. Through sports, girls can gain self-esteem and counteract the negative pressures and societal expectations often perpetuated by social media.

“We have to look at things girls are better at,” Paige says. As an example, Paige describes her experience in rowing, explaining how synchronization and communication are just as critical as strength. In her experience, when boys and girls first learn to row, the girls’ teams often perform better because the girls intuitively work together. It takes longer for the boys to catch up. 

As Paige so aptly demonstrates both in her writing and herself, girls can derive a positive self-image from sports, if only they can break through the social cage and embrace the strength within. 

“Aggressiveness is often seen as a negative trait, for girls at least,” Paige says, describing the stereotypes often associated with girls in sports and in life. “Which I believe is incredibly unfortunate as aggressiveness can also be described as a drive to seek out and earn what you want. I believe more women should wear this trait proudly as we step into the spotlight on the world platform.”

With young women like Paige Brotherton in the world, I think that just might happen.

K.L. Kranes is a blogger and author of young adult novels. Her debut novel, The Travelers, was published in 2016 by Saguaro Books, LLC. See more from K.L. at www.klkranes.com/blog.

Profile

A Writer & Her Garden

 A granddaughter helps her grandmother’s legacy continue to flourish.

Written by Hayleigh Worgan   Photos courtesy of Anne Spencer House & Garden MuseumIn early 2008, Shaun Spencer Hester sat on her mother’s porch contemplating where her career would take her next. She caught sight of her grandmother’s home across the street, and an idea began to take shape. A historic landmark, the Anne Spencer House and Garden Museum (part of the Anne Spencer Memorial Foundation, Inc.), was maintained by Hester’s parents, but closed to the public. A historian, preservationist, and writer, Hester decided to reopen the museum in time for Virginia’s Annual Garden Day. 

When she stepped inside, she was struck by the feeling that she had stepped back in time. In that moment, she recalls, she knew that it was imperative to preserve as many of the original features of the home and garden as she could. With the windows clean and the floor swept, she opened the doors in time for spring that year. She became the museum’s curator, and introduced a new generation to the life and work of her grandmother, Anne Spencer. 

(photo: Anne Spencer in 1940)

Every inch of the Spencer property tells a story. In her time, Spencer used her garden as a sanctuary and gathering place, hosting intellectuals and African American travelers during years when our country was deeply segregated. Both inside the home and out in her community, she understood the value of planting seeds and helping them grow. An important figure in the literary and cultural movement of the 1920s and Harlem Renaissance, Spencer left quite a legacy. Her many accomplishments include being the second African American published in the Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry (1973), assisting in the foundation of the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, and working as a librarian for the all-black Dunbar High School for twenty years. 

“The whole reason she wanted that job was because, at the time, there were no libraries in Lynchburg open to African Americans,” Hester says. “She thought, if she got the job, she would be able to allow access—not necessarily physical access—but she would be able to check out books for people in her community.”

Sources have described Spencer as a recluse because of the many hours she spent, day and night, working in her garden. Although she enjoyed her time alone, this accusation is unsubstantiated. Not only did she welcome people into her garden and home, she listened to their stories.

“For my grandmother,” Hester explains, “her garden was a place she could entertain visitors and guests. It was a way for her to connect to people, but it was also a place for her to get away from people, and she used it in both of those ways.”

The cottage in Spencer’s garden was built by her husband, Edward. There, she would escape to write poetry and prose that continues to be published in anthologies today. 

“It was a place to think and just be quiet. I think that is important for everyone, writer or not, and what better place to be than with nature?” Hester adds.

By preserving her grandmother’s home and gardens, Hester, the Anne Spencer Memorial Foundation’s Board of Directors, and the advisory board, are doing much more than providing another lovely stop on a garden tour. They are sharing part of the African American experience in American history.

“I tell people on these tours, when you think about my grandparents who met when they were young, in the 1800s, they were the first generation of their family to be freely educated just over 100 years ago. It’s really not that long ago. To see how we’ve grown, and understand the African American story over all of those periods of time is just starting to be told and of interest to all people. These stories aren’t written down in our history books, and if we don’t write them down they will all be lost. It’s now time for people to tell their story, whether it’s good or bad,” Hester says. 

Hester is currently working on a book detailing the history of her family, including the many ways they impacted the Civil Rights Movement and integration. Follow her on Instagram (@shaun.hester) for current information on the project. 

Visitation to the Anne Spencer House and Garden Museum slows down in October, but the garden is an unforgettable sight, even in the fall. From mid-October to March, Hester encourages those interested in a tour to book it two weeks in advance through the museum’s website. For more information visit www.annespencermuseum.com.

Hayleigh is a freelance writer, independent author, and writing consultant. In 2017, she published her first novel, The Huntsman: A modern retelling of Red Riding Hood. She spends a lot of time traveling and exploring new regions for inspiration, but Roanoke will always be her home. www.hayleighworgan.com.