Tag Archives: weaving

Riot Rooster Makers!

The 2017 Riot Rooster: Fire Rooster event kicks off TODAY, Friday, November 17 from 5-10pm. Friday evening will be our Bella Girls Night Out, and visitors can enjoy a photo booth, purchase food and beverages, and tour the vendors before the Saturday market!

The Saturday market is the same day as the Grandin Children’s Parade. Beth Deel, organizer of Riot Rooster, encourages families to attend the parade and then visit Riot Rooster together.

“A lot of people call this the beginning of the holiday season. It is a good weekend for gathering, right before Thanksgiving,” Beth explains. “Bring the whole family!”

This will be Riot Rooster’s ninth year, and its fifth year at 16 West Marketplace. This month, we are featuring nine makers from the show to give a sneak peek of what you can expect. Check them out, and visit www.facebook.com/RIOTrooster for more details as the event approaches.

Meridith Entingh, of Meridith Weaves, will participate in Riot Rooster for the second time this year. If you visited Meridith in 2016, you may remember her assortment of unique and beautiful handwoven projects. Although she will have a few of those available again this year, she will also offer hand dyed items such as towels as scarves. “I love color,” she says. “It’s the thing that attracts people the most. Working with color is a lot more fun for me than working with a pattern. My goal is to have people interested in weaving and textiles, but with a little more variety.” www.meridithweaves.com

Icky Eye Ink, owned by Yashmin Barton, will be marking its third year at Riot Rooster this fall. Yashmin taught herself to knit over ten years ago, shortly after losing most of the vision in her left eye and part of the vision in her right eye. She makes scarves, hats, and blankets all year in preparation for the holiday season. Although she sticks to the same three projects, Yashmin allows herself to get creative with color selection. The result are bright, unique and fun pieces to guide her customers through what can be a dreary winter season. Her best seller every year is a piece she’s lovingly dubbed, “The Frankenstein.” Follow Yashmin on Instagram at #ickyeyeink and email her at ickyeyeink@gmail.com to come up with a new creation together!

Stina Anderson, of ARTeries by Stina, is a passionate environmentalist and advocate for recycling and clean living. She has found that upcycling is the best way to reuse and reinvent textile materials into new and beautiful clothing. This will be ARTeries Mobile Boutique’s second year at Riot Rooster. Based in Asheville, North Carolina, they love visiting Roanoke in their fashion truck, because it gives them the opportunity to see friends they’ve met from seven years at FloydFest. Customers can look forward to their holiday line of jewel toned velvet skirts, fingerless gloves, and hoodie scarves (which make great gifts!)! www.arteriesbystina.com

Heady Closet began when Jordan Holland decided to invest in silver wire and precious stones. She started self-taught wire wrapping in 2013, and her creativity helped her branch out from there. Currently, she makes adorable children’s clothing that can be stretched and unrolled to wear  continuously from sizes 6M to 3T. She participated in Riot Rooster this past spring, but this will be her first fall experience. Jordan plans to have fun natural art pieces, baby and kids’ dresses, and shoe styles for babies and children. She loves seeing how happy her creations make those who visit her table—so make sure to stop by! www.facebook.com/headycloset

Piper Lane, of Magpiper Metalworks, has been passionate about jewelry, stones, and metals since she was a child. Every piece she makes is done with complete love for the craft. This will be her third year participating in Riot Rooster. At her table, customers will find custom, handcrafted jingle bells in two sizes. Silver, brass, and copper will be available. Piper will also be taking orders for personalized bells and jewelry. This year’s display will have more rose cut sapphire rings and pendants of several colors including pinks, blues, and some earthy shades. Also, don’t miss her hand stamped mandala pendants and affordable etched and stamped copper cuffs! www.magpipermetalworks.com

The Paisley Poppy began in October 2015 after several years of encouragement and support for owner, Krista Nance. Krista loves to create new projects for herself and others, and custom orders are some of her favorite projects because she loves matching fabric to her customers. Among her best sellers at Riot Rooster are her “Unpaper Towels.” These cloth towels offer a convenient, stylish, and eco-friendly alternative to paper towels. Additionally, customers can purchase her accordion clutch wallets, pocket pillows, wet bags, and snack bags. Some new things she’s offering this year include aprons, memory games and I-spy bags for kids, Bed Caddies, and some limited series Roanoke zipper bags. www.thepaisleypoppystore.etsy.com

Lyndsey Dickerson, of Unbound, grew up in an artistic family, and she began to explore the art of jewelry making about five years ago. As a self-taught silversmith, she is passionate about bringing her creative vision to life through nature-inspired metal and gemstone pieces. This will be her third year at Riot Rooster, and customers old and new will fall in love with her unique mountain collection of rings, necklaces, and earrings. Unbound body care products will make their Riot Rooster debut this year, including natural body butters and scrubs, deodorants, roll-on perfume oils, therapeutic essential oil blends, beard wax, and much more! www.etsy.com/shop/UnboundElements

Frances West was inspired to begin making kinetic mobiles after a year-long stay in Denmark. A combination of the long Scandinavian winters and seeing the mobiles everywhere she turned led Frances to give them a try. Although she has been part of Riot Rooster for several years, this will be the year that her new business, Fulcrom Mobiles, makes its debut there. She will consider doing custom projects for customers, so consider visiting her to find out more about how a mobile can fit into your life! You can also contact Frances via email at fulcrommobiles@gmail.com  to receive more information about her mobiles and place your order.

Lynn Donihe, of Willow Pine Studio, began working with mosaics because of a need to focus on something intently and an obsession with tiny little handmade Moroccan tile that packs so much intense color and texture into one itty-bitty surface. Belt buckles are her perfect canvas—small enough for the intricate designs she wanted and a fun and unexpected place for a little bit of art. This will be her fifth year at Riot Rooster, and she will bring new designs for buckles and pendants in addition to old favorites. Additionally, she will have a collection of small, stacked sculptures and wall pieces that include many of those same designs. www.etsy.com/shop/WillowPineStudio

 

 

 

Open Studios Artist: Meridith Brehmer Entingh

Meridith Bremer Entingh developed a fascination with textiles when she was very young. She started knitting at age seven, and continued to explore the things she could do with fiber. In the 60s and 70s, she worked with embroidery, macrame, and needlepoint. Under the guidance of her father, she switched her major from textiles to business in college, but she never lost her love for working with fiber.

“In the mid-1990s, I became friends with a wonderful weaver, Jane Kinzler Anthony. She had a studio in her basement where she wove beautiful tapestries she sold as office art, as well as functional weaving,” Meridith recalls. “Just seeing what she wove inspired me.” Meridith began taking classes at an arts studio in Old Town Alexandria, and volunteered to work in their yarn shop. She purchased her first loom within the year.

How long have you lived in Roanoke?
We moved here 11 years ago. Part of the criteria for purchasing our home was that there be a room for my weaving studio. Our house has this great little room, 11×11 with built-in cupboards. There was room for my loom and plenty of storage. I quickly outgrew the room with the purchase of my second floor loom in 2007. So, in 2013 , we built a new weaving studio. I bought another large floor loom this year, so now it has two large floor looms, and it is bursting at the seams. 

How long have you been involved with Open Studios?
This is my fourth year on the tour. I asked to be involved in 2014 when my new studio was completed. In my travels around the area to do demonstrations, people are fascinated with how the loom works and they want to know about the process. For this reason, I felt that my studio would be a good addition to the tour. By visiting the studio, people can see all of the tools and the process from start to finish.

Do you have a favorite piece? Why is it your favorite?
My favorites evolve over time. One is the first scarf I ever made 13 years ago. It was woven on a 4-harness table loom. It’s made of alpaca, in cream and a pale grey green. I found the design in a weaving book and was very pleased by the result. I know that creating it inspired me to continue weaving. Most recently, I’ve enjoyed creating table runners and wall hangings using many colors and geometric designs. It’s as close as I can get to drawing and painting with yarn.

Would you say that any of your work is more a reflection of living in Roanoke or your travels and experiences outside of Roanoke?
Both. I’ve lived in many places including up state New York, Oregon, Colorado, and Northern Virginia before moving to Roanoke eleven years ago. I think my work is a reflection of the diversity of the places I have lived in my life. Last year, I designed and wove a ministerial stole for my church. I wanted the stole to be representative of the Roanoke Valley. It is hand painted (dyed) in curves that remind me of our mountains with the Roanoke Star placed on top of the curves. When worn, the Star sits just below the minister’s left shoulder where he can touch it when expressing something heartfelt. 

Meridith’s work will be available alongside participating artists through Open Studios Roanoke, beginning on April 29-30. Visit www.openstudiostourroanoke.com for more information on Meridith and participating artists!

Woven for Mutts Helps Local Dogs

Ariel Lev has always loved dogs. She and her husband were able to rescue two, but they found that they were not in a place to have more than that at the same time. Still, like many animal lovers, she knew she wanted to do more.

Photo Jan 04, 12 33 53 PM“Donating money was one thing, but I couldn’t always do as much as I wanted to,” Ariel explains. “Volunteering and fostering are dangerous for me because I know that would mean a third dog for us, and we are unable to do that right now. Walking away from those dogs in need would be heartbreaking.”

With all of these things resting in the back of her mind, Ariel sat down last summer to watch a friend weave. Her friend let her try it out, and shortly thereafter, Ariel bought her first loom.

Ariel began posting pictures of her creations on social media and received an onslaught of support from her friends. The interest generated a new set of questions.

Photo Jan 04, 12 32 36 PM“I have a full-time job, and I didn’t want to commit myself to making a profit or selling my weavings to friends,” she says. “What would I charge them? What would I do with the money? At that point, I realized that I could sell them, but donate the money to senior dogs in shelters. Donating the money keeps the acting fun and fulfilling for me.”

As many of us already know, a lot of shelter dogs are seniors. People decide they can’t keep them, they move, or sometimes, unfortunately, owners die and the pets don’t have anywhere to go. Puppies are quickly adopted out of shelters because they are an easy sell. Potential adoptive families often avoid the dogs who already have someone else’s habits or illnesses. They forget that the dogs who are not always the most appealing also need and deserve a loving, safe, and warm environment.

“Senior dogs have lived their entire lives with a human and, all of a sudden, find themselves in a concrete cell wondering what happened,” Ariel adds. “As our dogs have gotten older, I’ve fallen more in love with their greying faces. When I see other little grey faces in shelters, it breaks my heart.”

Photo Jan 04, 12 31 46 PMLast month, Ariel hit her first thousand dollar mark and donated the money to Angels of Assisi. She has committed to donating every one thousand dollars she makes from her creations to a different shelter, and the next beneficiary will be Franklin County Humane Society Planned Pethood. Currently, she chooses shelters out of her interest in them. However, if the business continues to grow, she will be accepting nominations.

Ariel will also begin teaching weaving to the public this month in a series of classes at the Taubman Museum of Art on February 5, 12, and 19. Visit www.taubmanmuseum.org for more information on the class, and check out Ariel’s Etsy shop at www.etsy.com/woven4mutts.